Internal Medicine Residency

Explore a wealth of opportunities in one of the nation’s top medicine programs.

You’ll move from a small number of required rotations to a wide range of options that allow you to pursue your passions in research, hospital medicine, primary care, and subspecialty care. We’ll help you tailor your program to your interests, with the diverse patients, rich clinical and research resources, and expert mentors you would expect from an academic medical center.

Grow Here

Our programs attract residents who are prepared to maximize their clinical and research training in a high-energy and supportive learning environment.

About the Program

Established in the early 1930s, the three-year Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Iowa has a long tradition in its three-part mission to be a leader in teaching, research, and patient care.

We offer:

  • exposure to renowned faculty members who are committed to your growth and development.
  • a strong reputation nationally, built on more than a century of excellence for our training programs.
  • an innovative longitudinal teaching system that will connect you with mentors who are dedicated to your success.
  • a blend of clinical and research experiences for your training, in state-of-the-art facilities for pursuing your passions.
  • a robust X+Y outpatient curriculum, which focuses on primary care and subspecialty clinics, ultrasound, and teaching skills.
  • unrivaled opportunities, including a physician-scientist training program, masters in medical education certificate program, and care delivery to underserved areas in the United States and abroad.
  • the convenience and livability of a vibrant city, where you’ll find opportunities to foster your interests and personal life.

We welcome you to learn more about our people and programs.

Message from the Program Director

As director of the Residency Program in the Department of Internal Medicine, it’s my honor to introduce you to the array of opportunities that exist at the University of Iowa. We believe we can provide you with the kind of individualized instruction and experiences that will help you transition from one phase of your professional career to the next. We aim to produce graduates who excel as clinicians, physician scientists, and teachers.

At our world-renowned residency, we offer:

We have a strong leadership team made up of outstanding associate program directors, motivated and inspired chief residents, creative and enthusiastic faculty, and dependable and involved site directors. Each of us works tirelessly to optimize the training experience for our resident physicians. Our program enables house staff to develop excellent clinical skills, while also preparing them to meet long-term career goals.

While we have a long tradition of training outstanding clinicians, we also continually work to keep our curriculum and methods cutting-edge. The program leadership works closely with chief residents and other core educators and invites input from residents in designing and refining innovative programs. For example, we’ve recently instituted a “4+1 program” that allows residents an improved ambulatory experience, guided career and mentor choice at the same time maintaining a balanced work-life experience. This allows residents to immediately begin exploring the subspecialty that interests them while also exposing them to fields they may not have previously considered.

Another example of our unique and cutting-edge program is our Master Clinician Program/Clinical Reasoning Curriculum. A pillar of our educational focus has been to teach our residents clinical reasoning and problem solving. Our residency produces life-long learners capable of unraveling the most impenetrable puzzles. No matter a resident’s area of career focus, our residency program significantly raises his or her clinical reasoning performance level.

We believe that our residents should not only be life-long learners of medicine but life-long teachers of medicine. To that end, we have developed the Teaching Skills Curriculum, which many residents find complements their formal training and enhances their clinical skills. One career path a resident may consider is becoming a clinician educator and thus may be interested in pursuing a Masters in Medical Education.

We understand that every resident has unique interests and career goals, and we have developed our training program to meet as many specifications as possible. No matter the resident’s long-term career goals, our residency program taps into a wealth of knowledge and experience that exists in our department’s faculty, creating specific mentorship experiences, and offering residents career-shaping opportunities.

If you are looking for a program that will challenge you and provide you with the experience and guidance to prepare you for the next step in your career, we hope you will continue to explore the University of Iowa’s Internal Medicine Residency program. If you have any questions about any aspect or whether our program is right for you, please don’t hesitate to contact us.


Watch Dr. Suneja's 2020 Carver College of Medicine Commencement Address:

Mission and Aims

Words most used by recruites to describe our program!The Department of Internal Medicine Residency Program is dedicated to educating future clinicians, physician scientists and scholars to serve the people of the state of Iowa, the nation and the world.  Our program provides comprehensive, broad-based training and is dedicated to developing confident, knowledgeable, professional and caring internists who will be well prepared for their roles in the rapidly changing environment of healthcare.  The three-year accredited program ensures that residents develop a strong foundation in general internal medicine so that they are able to address the wide range of problems encountered in clinical practice.  The program also responds to special interests of residents by offering experiences and instruction to meet individual career goals and to help residents transition from one phase of their professional career to the next.

Mission:  The mission of the program is to train the next generation of physicians in medicine who are well prepared to practice competently and independently in the areas of academic medicine, community practice and biomedical research.

Program Aims:

  • Train future physicians to be lifelong learners, committed to self-reflection, self-assessment and improvement
  • Deliver a core curriculum allowing residents to gain knowledge that reflects understanding in the art of inquiry and science of discovery
  • Develop clinical reasoning and judgement skills necessary to approach complex as well as common problems that present to the generalist
  • Develop the necessary skills and knowledge used in the areas of teaching, quality and safety,  and scholarship
  • Provide clinical experiences allowing residents to learn and practice delivering team-based care that reflects respect for patient values and preferences
  • Provide opportunities and flexibility supporting individualized career plans
  • Foster a learning environment that promotes progressive responsibility and graduated autonomy
  • Maintain a culture of wellness in which resident support, camaraderie and mentorship are top priorities

Core Values:

  • professionalism
  • humanism
  • scholarship
  • curiosity and learning
  • diversity
  • social context and responsibility
  • excellence
  • career guidance and mentoring
  • camaraderie
  • integrated collaborative learning environment
  • wellness

Categorical Program: Overview

Our three-year categorical program emphasizes the development of not only well-rounded but also well-respected physicians, who are equipped with the essential tools and competency to excel in areas such as academic, sub-specialty, hospitalist and the community-based fields of internal medicine.

Our three-year categorical program emphasizes the development of well-rounded physicians, equipped with the tools to excel in all areas of internal medicine.

Residents within our program are provided progressive patient care responsibilities allowing for academic and professional growth as they transition toward independent practice. During this time, they are given the opportunity to explore potential career paths, including primary care, hospital medicine, sub-specialty care, and research.

While all residents will be exposed to the full breadth of internal medicine training through required rotations, we offer the opportunity to tailor educational opportunities to the individual resident. This is accomplished through longitudinal sub-specialty clinics in our outpatient Y-week curriculum, elective rotations that suit career-related interests, and opportunities for research. In addition, we also have hospital medicine and primary care focused pathways for interested residents.

See what else sets our program apart by exploring our site, where you can find in-depth descriptions and contact information for many of the exciting opportunities the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics has to offer.

We would love to hear from you, feel free to contact us with any further questions!

Preliminary Year: Overview

A one-year program is available for candidates who require Internal Medicine training prior to starting another specialty. The structure and requirements of this year are the same as the Categorical program, with the exception of omitting the Ambulatory curriculum.

Medicine-Psychiatry Program: Overview

The Internal Medicine and Psychiatry Combined Residency Program at the University of Iowa offers residents the opportunity to provide comprehensive care to patients with comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions.

Visit the Medicine-Psychiatry website.

Categorical 4+1 Program Schedule: year at a glance

The schedule adopted by the University of Iowa Internal Medicine Residency is a 4+1 model. Residents rotate for 4 weeks on an inpatient rotation or consult service followed by a 1 week ambulatory experience. The ambulatory week consists of 5 half days of continuity clinic, 2 half days of specialty clinics, an educational half day focused on ambulatory medicine, ultrasound, teaching skills, and quality improvement. This dedicated ambulatory week enhances the outpatient experience through patient continuity and educational opportunity.

Click on the image to view the full size PDF:

Program schedule

Watch this brief overview by 2020-2021 Chief Resident, Dr. Nick Arnold

Click here for a more in-depth explanation of how a resident’s time is scheduled, including information about how QI projects, vacation, our new teaching skills rotation, and research can all be built in.

Ambulatory Training

The goal of the ambulatory week is to promote a stronger emphasis on ambulatory medicine including focused practice and education. Organized around a number of outpatient medicine themes, residents will be exposed to a comprehensive, longitudinal curriculum delivered through interactive workshops, peer teaching, and self-directed and experiential learning.

This is an example of what your ambulatory week may look like.

Continuity Clinics

  • Five half days in continuity of care clinic at the VA or Iowa River Landing
  • Opportunity to build personal panel of patients over 3 years of residency
  • Responsibility for preventative care and chronic disease management

Specialty Clinics

  • Experiences in required and career focused specialty clinics
  • Early introduction to a mentor in resident’s specialty interest

Pre-clinic conference

  • Interactive discussions with colleagues and faculty
  • Resident presentations covering learning topics encountered in outpatient clinic

Administrative Half Day

  • Time free of clinical duties
  • Opportunity to complete clinic notes, call patients regarding test results, work through

Quality Improvement Half Day

  • Time provided to work on quality improvement projects

Academic Half Day

Ultrasound Training

  • Introduction to basic point-of-care ultrasound concepts and skills
  • Combined didactic and hands on training

Board Review

  • High-yield review for Internal Medicine board examination
  • Emphasis on clinical pearls for diagnostic illness scripts and patient management

Ambulatory Workshops

  • Three year curriculum
  • Ambulatory topics structured into multiple content domains
  • Interactive sessions focused on application of medical knowledge or procedure skills acquisition

Quality Improvement Curriculum

  • Team-based quality improvement projects
  • Enhanced knowledge and skills in patient safety and quality improvement

Resident Teaching Skills Curriculum

  • Introduction to skill set used when in role of clinician educator
  • Skill practice and feedback during interactive sessions

ambulatory workshops include cardiology, pulmonary, women's health, men's health, transgender health, endocrine, musculoskeletal, basic procedure skills, mental health, and wellness

Rotations and Electives

Photo: Rotations and Electives - Duchman, WilsonAlthough every resident at UIHC rotates through a handful of required services, schedules are readily tailored to fit the career goals of each individual resident.

Highlighted Career Development Electives

Inpatient

Ambulatory Week

Subspecialty Clinics and Consult Services

  • Allergy/Immunology
  • Anesthesia
  • Cardiology
  • Dermatology
  • EKG
  • Endocrinology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Geriatrics
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Neurology
  • Palliative Care
  • Pulmonary
  • Renal
  • Rheumatology;
  • Surgical Co-Management
  • Visiting Resident at External Hospital

 Acute, Ambulatory and Emergency Care Settings

  • Acute Care Clinic - IRL
  • Access Clinic - VAMC
  • Continuity of Care Clinics
  • Emergency Treatment Center - UIHC
  • Emergency Room - VAMC

Iowa City Free Medical Clinic Rotation

Cardiology Inpatient Teaching Service

Comprised of a staff Cardiologist, a senior resident, and two interns, the inpatient cardiology team diagnoses and manages patients with acute cardiovascular illness who do not require an ICU admission. Common problems seen on this service include acute coronary syndromes, decompensated heart failure, valvular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pericarditis, and endocarditis. The team admits patients daily, with no overnight call for team members, as the patients are monitored by the on-call CVICU resident. Didactic lectures are given by the staff physician on service during established dedicated teaching time

Cardiology collage

Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU)

Cardiovascular facility

Comprised of a staff Cardiologist, a Cardiology fellow, and four senior medical residents, the CVICU team manages up to 16 patients requiring ICU admission for cardiac causes. Common problems seen on this service include severe decompensated heart failure/cardiogenic shock, STEMI, aortic dissection, and acute severe valvular dysfunction.

Cardiovascular facility

Residents will become comfortable with management of invasive hemodynamic monitoring including PA catheters, cardiac assist devices including Intra-aortic balloon pump and Impella, as well as cardiac ultrasound/echocardiography.

Cardiovascular facility

Each resident takes call every 4th night with one day off per week. At night, the on-call resident covers the Cardiology teaching service in addition to the CVICU.

Hematology-Oncology Inpatient Teaching Service

Comprised of a staff Hematologist-Oncologist, a senior resident, and two interns, the Hematology-Oncology inpatient service manages patients with acute hematologic or oncologic issues, chemotherapy complications, and palliative care/symptom management. The team works in concert with our palliative care services as well as various other consultative services to provide care. The team admits patients daily, with no overnight call for team members. Overnight admissions are supported by a night float senior resident and intern.

Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU)

MICU

Two teams, comprised of a Pulmonary/Critical Care physician, a Pulmonary/Critical Care fellow, 2-3 senior residents, and Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), the MICU teams staff and care for patients in our 26 bed medical intensive care unit.

MICU

Emergency medicine residents will, at times, rotate in the MICU and participate in the care teams.

MICUMICU

Common problems managed in the MICU include sepsis/shock, acute and chronic respiratory failure, and other critical conditions.

Medicine/Psychiatry Unit

One team, comprised of Medicine and Psychiatry staff, one senior resident, and two interns care for up to a total of 15 patients with medical and psychiatric complaints. The team admits patients daily with no overnight call. Overnight admissions are supported by a night float senior resident and intern. If you are interested in a combined Internal Medicine and Psychiatry residency, please visit their page:

Internal Medicine-Psychiatry Residency

Teaching Resident Rotation

Teaching residents

“The teaching resident elective readily helped me identify my strengths and weaknesses”

“Really fun rotation…good to have a dedicated time to focus on how to educate”

 

The Teaching Resident Rotation is designed as a 4-week experience to improve the teaching skills of participating third-year residents as well as prepare these residents for serving effectively in the role of medical educator. The rotation also provides a dedicated educational venue to demonstrate skills obtained through participation in the longitudinal Teaching Skills Curriculum.

Extensive teaching opportunities support residents in the development of skills essential for effective teaching in common situations. These teaching opportunities include small group facilitation, interactive classroom lecturing, simulation sessions and bedside instruction. The resident will also develop skills of how to prepare and work with multiple levels of learners as well as develop time management skills needed to be an effective medical educator.

Feedback is provided to each resident through written evaluations from students he/she taught during the rotation as well as after direct observation by a faculty mentor (usually the rotation director). The resident will also perform a self-reflection of his/her teaching by evaluating a video recording of a teaching session of his/her choosing.

Further Training Opportunities in Medical Education


Teaching Elective Goals and Objectives

The Teaching Resident rotation is designed to improve the teaching skills of participating residents and to prepare third-year residents for serving effectively in the role of teacher/medical educator. Through training, extensive opportunities to teach, and feedback and evaluation, the Teaching Resident is able to develop the skills necessary to provide quality educational experiences to medical students and colleagues. Built into this 4-week experience is the opportunity to interact with faculty mentors who provide feedback and evaluation of the resident’s performance in various teaching activities. 

Rotation Goals:

  • Develop the skills to become an effective medical educator.
  • Strengthen and promote the educational continuum of teaching and learning.
  • Enhance the educational mission of the Department of Internal Medicine for excellence in teaching.

Learning objectives:

  • Identify and promote strategies to create favorable learning environments.
  • Facilitate the acquisition of knowledge and skills using various teaching techniques.
  • Control each teaching session by demonstrating the ability to address assigned topics efficiently while maintaining the focus and pace of each session.
  • Develop and deliver an educational project/curriculum during the rotation. 

Teaching Residents

Click image for larger view.


Contact Information:



M. Lee Sanders, PhD, MD, FACP
Director, Teaching Resident Rotation

Ambulatory Week

For further information on our ambulatory curriculum, please visit the ambulatory curriculum homepage.

UIHC Inpatient Medicine Service

Inpatient rotation

Three teams, comprised of a Teaching Hospitalist, one senior resident, three interns, and 2-3 medical students diagnose and mange adults of all ages and backgrounds with a wide range of medical conditions.The teams rotate through a pre-determined call cycle, admitting patients on “pre-call” and “on-call” days but not on “post-call” days. Two of the interns take care of the patients during the daytime, in addition to admitting patients. The third intern rotates on an overnight call schedule (working every third night), averaging 3-4 nights per rotation. The senior resident is not responsible for night coverage, as this is provided by a night-float senior resident.

 Support staff includes team-specific social workers, nurse navigators, pharmacists, undergraduate assistants, and unit clerks who assist with discharge planning and follow-up appointments.

Educational Opportunities

Wards 101 - During the UIHC Inpatient medicine rotation, there is protected time for intern-focused teaching on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. During these sessions, interns and medical students are given an opportunity to discuss and work through cases, focus on practical management of common inpatient issues, and discuss evidence-based topics pertinent to hospital medicine.

Ultrasound - Ultrasound machines are readily available for the inpatient medical service to assist in performing hemodynamic assessment as well as guidance for procedures. Ultrasound education is integrated into our ambulatory curriculum. We are also working on obtaining handheld Butterfly devices for easier access and use on the wards!

Iowa City VA Medical Center Medicine Service

Three teams, comprised of a Teaching Hospitalist, one senior resident, two interns, a pharmacist, and medical students admit, diagnose, and manage a populations of veterans with a wide range of medical conditions. The Iowa City VA features an open ICU which allows the inpatient teams to care for a mixture of ward and ICU patients. The ICU patients are staffed daily with a pulmonary/critical care staff physician and fellow.

Each inpatient team admits daily, with interns rotating on overnight call every 6th night. The senior resident is not responsible for overnight admissions, as this is covered by a night-float senior.

Distinction in Medical Education (DIME)

DIME is a two-year pathway which provides experiences and further educational instruction beyond the current three-year longitudinal resident teaching skills curriculum. The DIME pathway is open to senior residents who are in good standing in the residency program.  Application for the pathway occurs in the spring PGY1 year. Residents participating in DIME are immersed in a flexible, experience-based curriculum with hands-on teaching activities at its core. To foster skills in educational scholarship, residents are paired with a clinical educator mentor to complete a scholarly project.  The first class of residents to be awarded the Distinction in Medical Education certificate graduated in 2021.

GOALS

The DIME curriculum: 

  • supports knowledge and skill development in the areas of educational methods including curriculum development.
  • provides opportunities for early educational scholarship.
  • engages residents in mentor relationships with clinician educators.
  • aids residents in preparing for future careers in medical education.
  • prepares residents for involvement and contribution to the residency program’s educational mission.

Requirements required for the successful completion of DIME: 

  • development and fulfillment of goals and objectives for experiences specific to individual interests
  • completion of the longitudinal curriculum assignments
  • demonstration of hands-on teaching of different levels of learners in a variety of settings
  • recorded teaching sessions for discussion and feedback
  • completion of a medical education-focused scholarly project in an area of interest
  • maintenance of a portfolio providing evidence of types of teaching experiences, quality of teaching efforts, evidence of impact as well as evidence of scholarship
  • presentation of the scholarly project to DIME committee as well as colleagues in DIME program
  • presentation of the capstone work encouraged (local, regional or national education meeting)

Residents successfully completing the pathway requirements graduate with a Distinction in Medical Education.  This information may be included in the overall summative graduation letter as well as placed in the residency program letter for fellowship and employment.

2020 Scholarly Projects

  • OSCE Effectiveness in Increasing Confidence over the Intern Year
  • LGBTQ Social Determinants Video Curriculum

2021 Scholarly Projects

  • Introduction to Medicine Workshop for Under-Represented High School Students
  • MICU Curriculum
  • Core Physical Exam Technique Review for Internal Medicine Clerkship Students
  • Basic Ventilator Education

Contact Information:



Jennifer Strouse, MD
Director, Distinction in Medical Education

Education and Conferences


Visit the
Internal Medicine Chief Residents' Blog
for easy access to conference recordings and educational materials.

Resident Core Conferences - Core conferences are held Monday-Friday at noon. These conferences are protected (pagers are covered by administrative staff) and lunch is provided. Goals of these conferences include enhancing medical knowledge, developing diagnostic-reasoning skills, and promoting principles of life-long learning.

Core Topics in Internal Medicine - Lecture series provided by a diverse set of clinical and research faculty ranging from general medicine, internal medicine subspecialties, and outside departments addressing clinical topics relevant to the training internal medicine resident

Case Presentations/Live from 6RC - A series of interactive conferences during which a case is presented by a Chief Resident or Inpatient Medicine senior resident. As the case unfolds, residents work as a group or in teams to build a differential diagnosis, work-up difficult cases, and discuss clinical reasoning and management strategies.

Journal Club - Monthly, senior residents in conjunction with pre-assigned faculty lead discussion on a critical appraisal of current primary literature in internal medicine or internal medicine subspecialties. There is added focus on study design and evidence-based medicine, fostering skills that will be essential as an independent practitioner.

R2 Talks - All second-year residents participate in creating and delivering a noon conference lecture as well as a handout on an educational topic of choice. Residents are paired with faculty mentors and are given feedback on effective presentation skills.

Monthly physiology lectures - This monthly case-based conference is designed to demonstrate how the application of physiologic principles enhances clinical reasoning. The format is case-based and interactive, and the discussion is facilitated by the Program Director and an Associate Program Director.

Clinical Reasoning Week - We conduct an intensive, week-long curriculum on diagnostic and clinical reasoning emphasizing the cognitive theory underlying clinical decision-making, the language of clinical reasoning, frameworks to approach a concern or disease and illness script models for organization, cognitive biases, and categorization of information. These concepts are reinforced throughout the year in all other didactic session and in clinical experiences.

Wards 101 - During the UIHC Inpatient medicine rotation, there is protected time for intern-focused teaching on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. During these sessions, interns and medical students are given an opportunity to discuss and work through cases, focus on practical management of common inpatient issues, and discuss evidence-based topics pertinent to hospital medicine.

Morning Report - Our weekly morning report is hosted by a resident on an ambulatory/elective rotation and progressively works through an interesting/difficult case in a small group setting with junior and senior residents. The focus is on clinical reasoning and the process of working up a chief complaint, with several short teaching points at the end.

Board Review - During the ambulatory Thursday afternoon curriculum, residents meet with a faculty facilitator or chief residents to participate in interactive group sessions. The assigned facilitator utilizes prepared ABIM-focused content with MKSAP question in order to reinforce clinical reasoning, key points, and test taking strategies. A faculty member from each subspecialty provides an in-depth review of internal medicine topics tailored to the ABIM certification exam. This is open to residents at any level of training.

Internal Medicine Grand Rounds - This traditional weekly conference provides an opportunity for the entire department to convene for an academic discussion which may range from innovative research, comprehensive updates on key topics, or visiting lecturers. In addition, Clinical Pathology Conferences (CPCs) are held monthly, integrating basic pathology into clinical scenarios.

Morbidity, Mortality, and Improvement Conference - Interdisciplinary case-based conference presented by residents and faculty evaluating a medical error, adverse, event, or near-miss scenario. Broad group discussion is utilized to identify contributors to adverse events. Monthly updates are provided on the outcomes of previously identified safety issues and the steps taken to resolve them.

House Staff Meetings - On a monthly basis, all of the residents meet with the chief residents and faculty to receive updates regarding anticipated events, program changes, and to provide an open forum for discussion of concerns.

Pathways

The Internal Medicine Residency Program offers the following pathways:

Hospitalist Pathway

Hospital medicine is rapidly gaining recognition as a medical specialty organized around the care of hospitalized patients. The hospitalist pathway is designed to enhance the educational experiences of residents through increased exposure to settings and topics likely to be encountered as a hospitalist. Residents are able to interact with their peers as well as faculty mentors who are interested in hospital medicine.

The Hospitalist Pathway rotations are designed to help residents

  • improve their management skills for hospitalized adults
  • improve their communication with consultants and other members of the healthcare team
  • develop leadership and teaching skills
  • develop time management strategies while functioning as a practitioner on an attending-directed service

While continuing in the categorical curriculum, residents following this pathway will experience increased exposure to hospital-based medicine through a series of career-specific rotations that emphasize inpatient management necessary for providing comprehensive inpatient care. Additional educational experiences highlight health care delivery systems, patient safety, multidisciplinary care and the business and management aspects of medicine.  The Hospitalist Pathway requires residents to complete a one-on-one experience with an experienced hospitalist on a non-teaching hospitalist service in either the academic or community setting.  Residents also are able to individualize their experiences by selecting from a number of electives including Stroke Team, SNICU, Sub-Consultant rotation, and Palliative care rotation.

Contact Information:

Recent Destinations of Past Residents

Cedar Rapids, IA
Chillicothe, OH
Decorah, IA
Iowa City, IA 
Naperville, IL 
Portland, OR
Sun City West, AZ
St. George, UT 
St. Paul, MN
Tucson, AZ
University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics 
University of Michigan
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
University of San Diego
Wenatchee Washington

Primary Care Pathway

Photo: Primary Care Pathway - LangstangelA career goal for many practicing internists is to establish long-term relationships with patients in the ambulatory care setting.  The Primary Care Pathway has been designed for residents who wish to prepare for the practice of ambulatory medicine and offers a concentrated exposure to ambulatory experiences over the three years of training.  The pathway is a flexible program that provides not only clinical experiences and education tailored to the care of ambulatory patients, but also supports residents by pairing them with a mentor who shares similar interests and career goals.  Serving as primary care physicians for their own panel of patients, residents in this pathway practice with selected faculty to improve and measure outcomes of care.

 The Primary Care Pathway rotations are designed to help residents develop:

  • skills needed to make office visits rewarding for both the patient and the physician
  • expertise in managing conditions common to the outpatient setting as well as in office procedures
  • an understanding of the challenges of running an outpatient practice
  • skills in teaching and research in ambulatory medicine

Residents choosing this pathway will participate in a 3-year longitudinal office-based practice rotation within the academic setting as well as in community-based private practice experience designed to address issues such as lifestyle, economics, and office management.   The Primary Care Pathway also allows the resident to pursue special interests through rotations such as sports medicine, ophthalmology, dermatology, social and community medicine, and alternative/complementary medicine.

Masters in Medical Education

The Masters in Medical Education (MME) is a competitive, 30 semester-hour program coordinated through the Office of Consultation and Research in Medical Education at the Carver College of Medicine. Learners enrolled in the masters program take seven core courses covering topics including educational measurement in medical education, current issues in medical education, instructional design and technology, teaching methods, clinical teaching, assessment in medical education and educational research and evaluation as well as electives. In addition to coursework, the participant develops a summative portfolio project.

"The Masters in Medical Education (MME) program provides residents, fellows and staff the opportunity to develop teaching skills specific to medical education. Guided by the faculty in the Office of Consultation and Research in Medical Education (OCRME), the curriculum introduces learners to different areas of evidence-based assessment and educational principles, and invites participants to contribute to this growing area of research while allowing them to complete a strong portfolio. Classes are physician schedule-friendly with online options or weekly seminars after 5:30 pm. The program timeline is flexible and highly supported by the department of Internal Medicine. I highly recommend this opportunity to any healthcare provider interested in utilizing medical education as a part of his/her career."

Andrea Weber, MD
Medicine-Psychiarty Resident ('17)

Learn more about the Masters in Medical Education program.

Physician Scientist Training Pathway

The Physician-Scientist Training Pathway (PSTP) is designed to streamline postgraduate training and to foster the early career development of physician-scientists who will be future leaders in academic medicine. The PSTP integrates residency training, clinical fellowship, and basic or clinical postdoctoral research training, thus facilitating the transition period between completion of the MD degree and first faculty position. Iowa’s PSTP is unique in the breadth of clinical programs and research opportunities. In addition to internal medicine, we accept trainees in eight departments and support research training with numerous T32 training grants.

Key Features

  • Individualized training for physician-scientists
  • Personalized career mentorship (program leadership, research mentor, mentoring committee)
  • Option of ABIM Research Pathway
  • Flexibility in clinical rotations and research training
  • Wide-range of training opportunities in basic or clinical research
  • Numerous enrichment activities including a noon seminar series that focuses on discussions related to career development, specific research projects, and keys to successful grant applications
  • Supplemental stipend for academic allowance and salary
    • $4,000/yr as academic allowance
    • $15,000/yr as supplemental salary stipend during research phase of training
  • Guaranteed subspecialty fellowship position

Program website

Twitter Icon@IowaPSTP

Contact Information

Residents as Teachers

Pyramid showing heirarchy: Resident Teaching Skills to Teaching Resdient to DIME Pathway to Masters of Medical Education

Studies have estimated that residents spend up to 20% of their time on teaching activities regardless of their department or future career plans.  Despite this significant responsibility for teaching medical students and colleagues along with patients and their families, residents often have not received formal instruction on how to be effective teachers.

The Internal Medicine Residency Program values the important role that residents assume as teachers.  The program also recognizes how complex medical teaching can be when the teacher must meet the needs of the learner while providing care for the patient.

In an effort to help residents develop teaching skills as well as gain confidence as teachers, the program has designed opportuni9ties for residents to improve their teaching skills during their training.

 

Resident Teaching Skills Curriculum

Pyramid showing heirarchy: Resident Teaching Skills (highlighted) to Teaching Resdient to DIME Pathway to Masters of Medical Education

All residents participate in a 3-year longitudinal Resident Teaching Skills curriculum during the “Y” week block (Thursday afternoon ambulatory curriculum).  The goal of the curriculum is to introduce residents to a knowledge base and skill set used when serving in the role of a clinical educator.  The curriculum delivers an experiential skill-based teaching curriculum allowing all residents to acquire, practice and implement specific skills for effective teaching; 2) provides recurring spaced teaching skills instruction promoting deliberate practice and reflection; and 3) helps residents gain confidence in their teaching skills. 

Learn more about the Teaching Skills Curriculum.

Teaching Resident Rotation

Pyramid showing heirarchy: Resident Teaching Skills to Teaching Resdient (highihted) to DIME Pathway to Masters of Medical Education

The Teaching Resident rotation is designed as a 4-week experience to improve the teaching skills of participating third-year residents as well as prepare these residents for serving effectively in the role of medical educator.  The rotation also provides a dedicated educational venue to demonstrate skills obtained through participation in the longitudinal Resident Teaching Skills curriculum.

Learn more about the Teaching Resident Rotation.

Distinction in Medical Education

Pyramid showing heirarchy: Resident Teaching Skills to Teaching Resdient to DIME Pathway (highlighted) to Masters of Medical Education

The Internal Medicine Residency Distinction in Medical Education (DIME) pathway is designed for residents who are interested in becoming clinician educators or wish to include medical education as part of their professional career. The DIME curriculum provides experiences and further educational instruction beyond the current three-year longitudinal resident teaching skills curriculum by focusing on curriculum design and development, educational innovations and educational scholarship.

Learn more about the Distinction in Medical Education pathway.

 

Masters in Medical Education

Pyramid showing heirarchy: Resident Teaching Skills to Teaching Resdient to DIME Pathway to Masters of Medical Education (highlighted)The  purpose of the Master in Medical Education is to develop a community of academic medical faculty with formal training in education who will create and sustain a culture of educational excellence with the Carver College of Medicine, the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, the university and the medical education community at-large.  The 30 semester hour degree brings together individuals across different departments in the Carver College of Medicine.  Learners take seven core courses, in addition to a summative educational portfolio project and electives.

Learn more about the Masters in Medical Education program.

Innovations

Teaching Skills Curriculum

In addition to a three-year, rolling curriculum, our program also offers a dedicated teaching rotation in the third year, as well as more advanced training.

Ultrasound Curriculum

Our longitudinal training in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) results in residency graduates with skills that would normally only be obtained in radiology or emergency medicine programs.

Quality & Safety Curriculum

Quality improvement benefits our patients and our systems, but it also provides our residents with an opportunity to lead a focused project often resulting in a publication or presentation at a regional or national society meeting. We have carved-out protected time for this work and our VA-funded Chief Resident for Quality & Safety is just one of the mentors guiding residents.

qUIkCoach

Through the department, we have been able to develop an app available for our residents called qUIkcoach. This is a new app that is able to request and provide just-in-time feedback on a variety of different skills including clinical reasoning, communication, oral presentation, and notes. This allows for more directed feedback with a quicker turnaround time.

Ultrasound Curriculum

Point of Care Ultrasound Curriculum Overview

The University of Iowa Internal Medicine Residency Program Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) Curriculum is a longitudinal, integrated, and progressive learning experience.  The POCUS curriculum is focused on teaching basic bedside ultrasonography and how it is utilized and applied to patient care in clinical internal medicine.  The curriculum is integrated into and taught longitudinally during the academic half day during each resident’s ambulatory week (y-week).  POCUS instruction is delivered by experienced faculty members, critical care fellows, and chief residents.  POCUS skills assessments are completed for residents during each year of their training and the POCUS curriculum is modified on a yearly basis to best adapt to the needs of the trainees.

Curriculum Goal: At the end of the longitudinal POCUS curriculum, the resident will be able to acquire, interpret, and apply focused cardiac, lung, pleural, abdominal, and vascular ultrasound imaging into their clinical reasoning and medical decision making.

Teaching Methods:

  • Independent pre-workshop learning materials (POCUS textbook chapters, online modules, etc)
  • Short didactic sessions
  • Hands-on scanning of simulated patients with live faculty mentors and real-time feedback
  • Pathological image interpretation sessions
  • Interactive ultrasound case studies

Modules:

Basic POCUS Modules (PGY-1) Advanced POCUS Modules (PGY-2 and above)
  • Introduction (US physics, US artifacts, knobology)
  • Lung and Pleural Ultrasound
  • Basic Cardiac Ultrasound
  • Abdominal Ultrasound (FAST)
  • Basic Vascular Ultrasound
  • Lower Extremity Venous Compression Ultrasonography (DVT)
  • BLUE Protocol
  • Advanced Cardiac Ultrasound
  • Gallbladder Ultrasound
  • Lumbar Puncture Ultrasound
  • Soft Tissue Ultrasound


Assessment: Pre- and post-curriculum assessment is completed annually to assess each individual trainee’s skills and knowledge acquisition and retention.  These yearly assessments are also used to assess the curriculum and guide ongoing improvements in the POCUS curriculum.  Assessment is completed using live ultrasound skills testing with faculty proctors, an electronic ultrasound knowledge assessment, and a resident survey. 


Teaching Skills Curriculum

Studies have estimated that residents spend up to 20% of their time on teaching activities regardless of their department or future career plans. Despite the significant responsibility for teaching medical students and colleagues along with patients and their families residents often have not received formal instruction on how to be effective teachers.

The Internal Medicine Residency Program values the important role that residents assume as teachers. The program also recognizes how complex medical teaching can be when the teacher must meet the needs of the learner while providing care for the patient.

In an effort to help residents develop teaching skills as well as gain confidence as teachers, the program has designed opportunities for residents to improve their teaching skills during their training.

Teaching Skills Curriculum: Residents participate in a longitudinal teaching skills curriculum during the “Y” week block. The goal of the Teaching Skills curriculum is to introduce residents to a knowledge base and skill set used when serving in the role of a clinical educator. The curriculum for all residents presents concepts and allows time for skill development.

Teaching Resident Rotation: For residents interested in further advancing their teaching skills, the residency program also offers a “Teaching Resident” rotation during the PGY3 year. Residents who participate in this 4-week block are provided with extensive opportunities and resources to develop skills for effective teaching including skills for small group facilitation, interacting and teaching with multiple levels of learners and time management. These residents have time available to develop an educational project such as a topic pocket card, a patient simulation or an electronic teaching module. Built into this experience is the opportunity to interact with faculty members who provide feedback and evaluation of the resident’s teaching skills in a variety of teaching activities and venues.

Masters of Medical Education: This program offers a Master in Medical Education degree in order to develop a community of academic medical faculty with formal training in education who will create and sustain a culture of educational excellence within the College of Medicine, the university, and the medical education community at-large.

Jane A. Rowat, MS
Director for Educational Development


Three-Year Rolling Curriculum

Teaching Skills Curriculum goals

The goal of the Teaching Skills curriculum is to introduce residents to a knowledge base and skill set used when serving in the role of a clinical educator. The longitudinal curriculum for all residents presents concepts and allows residents to practice skills associated with topics such as establishing the learning climate, motivating the learner, one-minute preceptor and feedback and evaluation as well as interactive teaching and evaluation.

Sessions are interactive covering a topic related to current best teaching practices. There is time for skill development and through the process of deliberate practice, residents design an action plan for further skill development. Residents complete pre-session readings and following each session are expected to refer to their action plan in teaching encounters.


Session #1: Introduction to Teaching Skills, Learning Climate and Effective Teachers

  1. identify characteristics of exemplary clinical teachers
  2. identify strategies to promote an effective learning climate
  3. demonstrate teaching behaviors that promote an effective learning climate
  4. develop an action plan to improve the learning climate in your own teaching

Session #2: Motivating the Learner

  1. examine contributing factors that affect a learner’s performance.
  2. explain one relevant motivational theory that covers extrinsic & intrinsic motivators.
  3. discuss the importance and impact of a good orientation.
  4. identify components of an orientation.

Session #3: One-Minute Preceptor

  1. describe the 5 elements of the one-minute preceptor model for clinical teaching.
  2. successfully apply the model to a simulated learner presenting a patient.
  3. use the model to develop an assessment of the learner’s current level of knowledge/skill and what the learner needs to know.

Session #4: Feedback

  1. define feedback and give rationale for providing feedback to learners.
  2. recognize barriers to giving feedback.
  3. identify characteristics of effective feedback.
  4. demonstrate effective feedback via observation and practice.
  5. develop an action plan for improving personal feedback skills.

Session #5: Interactive Teaching/Use of Technology

  1. know the goals of effective lecturing/presentation.
  2. describe components of effective lecturing/presentation.
  3. apply specific techniques for making lectures more interactive.

Session #6: Evaluation of Students, Peers and Faculty

  1. define evaluation and differentiate it from feedback.
  2. obtain an understanding of the use of commonly used evaluation tools and techniques.
  3. gain insight into common pitfalls surrounding evaluations.
  4. understand why accurate evaluation is important.

Quality Improvement Curriculum


Check out the
QI information on our blog

Resident Quality Improvement Curriculum

The Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Iowa is committed to engaging residents in team-based Patient Safety/Quality Improvement projects to develop their knowledge and skills. It is our goal for every resident to be empowered to impact the quality and safety of their patients’ care during their residency and in their future careers. Our ground breaking curriculum was published in the Journal of Graduate Medical Education.

Objectives

  • Actively and meaningfully participate in a team quality improvement project
  • Work effectively with inter-professional teams on continuous quality improvement
  • Apply continuous quality improvement to patient care
  • Disseminate work in scholarly format
  • Make a difference in the safety and quality of care of our current and future patients

Meet our Quality Improvement Leaders

Carly Kuehn, MD
Educational Director - Safety and Quality
Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine

 

Derek Hupp, MD
Chief Resident of Quality and Safety
Iowa City VA Medical Center

 

Quality Improvement Scholarship

The University of Iowa Department of Medicine understands that Quality Improvement and Patient Safety presents a phenomenal opportunity for scholarship for our residents. To showcase our commitment to our patient’s safety and to provide an avenue for scholarship the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics host an annual Quality and Safety Symposium in which our resident teams are given the opportunity, encouragement, resources, and mentorship to submit and present their projects. After this, many teams submit their projects to large regional and national meetings.

Since the development of our curriculum we have had…


Resident Quotes

“I felt as though I was making a quality change to improve the outpatient experience.”

“The QI curriculum gave us an opportunity for ownership over real positive change for our patients.”

“I actually know now the basics of how to design, implement, and interpret the results of a quality improvement project, which I didn’t know before.”



Research and Scholarship

  


Different from many residency programs, ours will immerse you in research that's informed by your own curiosity and passion. You’ll not only have the support of a faculty mentor, but the laboratory and computing resources of a major academic medical center. Residents are provided the opportunity for dedicated research time during their second and third years in addition to their quality improvement time. Our residents have used their research experiences as a foundation for a career of pursuing the great questions of modern medicine. They regularly present their findings at conferences and publish in scholarly journals.

Resident Research Experience

Photo: Research - DeZorzi"As an Internal Medicine resident at the University of Iowa, I have been able to develop skills that will be beneficial throughout an academic career in Cardiology. I came into residency without a strong knowledge of the nuances associated with clinical research and the writing skills needed to be successful in the field.  I was able to develop these skills during my time at the University of Iowa thanks to the support of our program including setting residents up with faculty mentors who are truly invested in our growth as investigators. During my time at Iowa, I have focused on clinical studies on the validity of billing codes in cardiac arrest patients, outcomes of patients after atrial fibrillation ablation, and numerous case reports. Thanks to dedicated time to research and constant support from the program and our department, I have been able to present at national meetings each year of residency including the Society of Hospital Medicine, Society of General Internal Medicine, International Academy of Cardiology and even on the world stage at the European Society of Cardiology in Munich, Germany.  These projects have also led to abstract and manuscript publications in peer reviewed journals." – Chris DeZorzi, MD

Dr. DeZorzi earned a Best Poster Award at the 2018 European Society of Cardiology meeting in Munich in August. Read the article here.

Physician Scientist Training Program

Learn about the University of Iowa's Physician Scientist Training Program.

Recent Publications

  1. Fox LM, Miksanek J, May NA, Scharf L, Lockridge JL, Veerapen N, Besra GS, Adams EJ, Hudson AW, Gumperz JE. Expression of CD1c enhances human invariant NKT cell activation by alpha-GalCer. Cancer Immun. 2013;13:9.
  2. Gao Z, Rasmussen TP, Li Y, Kutschke W, Koval OM, Wu Y, Wu Y, Hall DD, Joiner ML, Wu XQ, Swaminathan PD, Purohit A, Zimmerman K, Weiss RM, Philipson KD, Song LS, Hund TJ, Anderson ME. Genetic inhibition of Na+-Ca2+ exchanger current disables fight or flight sinoatrial node activity without affecting resting heart rate. Circ Res. 2013;112(2):309-17.
  3. Guyon A, Balbo M, Morselli LL, Tasali E, Leproult R, L'Hermite-Baleriaux M, Van Cauter E, Spiegel K. Adverse effects of two nights of sleep restriction on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in healthy men. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014;99(8):2861-8.
  4. Edrissian M, Fang M, Xu L, Vogelgesang SA. Rapidly Progressive Systemic Sclerosis in a Patient With Suspected Extragonadal Seminoma. J Clin Rheumatol. 2015;21(7):388.
  5. Fuller BM, Mohr NM, Miller CN, Deitchman AR, Levine BJ, Castagno N, Hassebroek EC, Dhedhi A, Scott-Wittenborn N, Grace E, Lehew C, Kollef MH. Mechanical Ventilation and ARDS in the ED: A Multicenter, Observational, Prospective, Cross-sectional Study. Chest. 2015;148(2):365-74.
  6. Jain S, Khera R, Suneja M, Gehlbach B, Kuperman E. Role of D-dimer Assays in the Diagnostic Evaluation of Pulmonary Embolism. Am J Med Sci. 2015;350(6):501-7.
  7. Khera R, Cram P, Girotra S. Letter by Khera et al Regarding Article, "Impact of Annual Operator and Institutional Volume on Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Outcomes: A 5-Year United States Experience (2005-2009)". Circulation. 2015;132(5):e35.
  8. Rasmussen TP, Wu Y, Joiner ML, Koval OM, Wilson NR, Luczak ED, Wang Q, Chen B, Gao Z, Zhu Z, Wagner BA, Soto J, McCormick ML, Kutschke W, Weiss RM, Yu L, Boudreau RL, Abel ED, Zhan F, Spitz DR, Buettner GR, Song LS, Zingman LV, Anderson ME. Inhibition of MCU forces extramitochondrial adaptations governing physiological and pathological stress responses in heart. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015;112(29):9129-34.
  9. Wu Y, Rasmussen TP, Koval OM, Joiner ML, Hall DD, Chen B, Luczak ED, Wang Q, Rokita AG, Wehrens XH, Song LS, Anderson ME. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases. Nat Commun. 2015;6:6081.
  10. Goddard AG, Azar AE. Work-related asthma secondary to IgE-mediated reactions to rodents successfully treated with immunotherapy. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2016;117(5):556-8.
  11. Goddard AG, McConomy B, Bathla G, Furqan M, Silverman WB. Air leakage in multiple compartments after endoscopy. Cleve Clin J Med. 2016;83(10):705-7.
  12. Hariman R, Patel P, Strouse J, Collins MP, Rosenthal A. Development of Eosinophilic Fasciitis during Infliximab Therapy for Psoriatic Arthritis. Case Rep Rheumatol. 2016;2016:7906013.
  13. Jain S, Erickson HL, Pezzulo A. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Hemodynamic Compromise in a Patient with Hepatic Hydrothorax. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2016;13(3):444-6.
  14. Jain S, Khera R. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus complicated by encephalitis. CMAJ. 2016;188(4):E74.
  15. Jonsdottir G, Lund SH, Bjorkholm M, Turesson I, Wahlin A, Mailankody S, Blimark C, Hultcrantz M, Porwit A, Landgren O, Kristinsson SY. Survival in multiple myeloma patients who develop second malignancies: a population-based cohort study. Haematologica. 2016;101(4):e145-8.
  16. Khera R, Cram P, Vaughan-Sarrazin M, Horwitz PA, Girotra S. Use of Mechanical Circulatory Support in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in the United States. Am J Cardiol. 2016;117(1):10-6.
  17. Khera R, Murad MH, Chandar AK, Dulai PS, Wang Z, Prokop LJ, Loomba R, Camilleri M, Singh S. Association of Pharmacological Treatments for Obesity With Weight Loss and Adverse Events: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA. 2016;315(22):2424-34.
  18. Phadke SD, Ghabour R, Swick BL, Swenson A, Milhem M, Zakharia Y. Pembrolizumab Therapy Triggering an Exacerbation of Preexisting Autoimmune Disease: A Report of 2 Patient Cases. J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep. 2016;4(4):2324709616674316.
  19. Raman R, Mott SL, Schroeder MC, Phadke S, El Masri J, Thomas A. Effect of Body Mass Index- and Actual Weight-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Doses on Pathologic Complete Response in Operable Breast Cancer. Clin Breast Cancer. 2016;16(6):480-6.
  20. Adams C, Vose A, Edmond MB, Lyckholm L. Shigella sonnei and hemolytic uremic syndrome: A case report and literature review. IDCases. 2017;8:6-8.
  21. An J, Garje R, Wanat KA, Leone JP. Dabigatran-related leukocytoclastic vasculitis. BMJ Case Rep. 2017;2017.
  22. Claflin KE, Sandgren JA, Lambertz AM, Weidemann BJ, Littlejohn NK, Burnett CM, Pearson NA, Morgan DA, Gibson-Corley KN, Rahmouni K, Grobe JL. Angiotensin AT1A receptors on leptin receptor-expressing cells control resting metabolism. J Clin Invest. 2017;127(4):1414-24.
  23. Fisher JB, Peterson J, Reimer M, Stelloh C, Pulakanti K, Gerbec ZJ, Abel AM, Strouse JM, Strouse C, McNulty M, Malarkannan S, Crispino JD, Milanovich S, Rao S. The cohesin subunit Rad21 is a negative regulator of hematopoietic self-renewal through epigenetic repression of Hoxa7 and Hoxa9. Leukemia. 2017;31(3):712-9.
  24. Hilliard CA, El Masri J, Goto M. Staphylococcus caprae bacteraemia and native bone infection complicated by therapeutic failure and elevated MIC: a case report. JMM Case Rep. 2017;4(9):e005112.
  25. Jonsdottir G, Gudmundsson J, Birgisson G, Sigurjonsdottir HA. Primary aldosteronism: from case detection to histopathology with up to 6 years of follow-up. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2017;19(4):424-30.
  26. Jonsdottir G, Lund SH, Bjorkholm M, Turesson I, Hultcrantz M, Porwit A, Jethava YS, Landgren O, Kristinsson SY. The impact of prior malignancies on second malignancies and survival in MM patients: a population-based study. Blood Adv. 2017;1(25):2392-8.
  27. Odufalu FD, Harris K. Hemochromatosis? When Bloodletting Is Not the Cure: A Teachable Moment. JAMA Intern Med. 2017;177(1):15-6.
  28. Story M. One Needle is Better Than Two: The Philosophy Surrounding Use of Local Anesthesia in Northern India. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2017;31(2):162-4.
  29. Zahra A, Fath MA, Opat E, Mapuskar KA, Bhatia SK, Ma DC, Rodman SN, III, Snyders TP, Chenard CA, Eichenberger-Gilmore JM, Bodeker KL, Ahmann L, Smith BJ, Vollstedt SA, Brown HA, Hejleh TA, Clamon GH, Berg DJ, Szweda LI, Spitz DR, Buatti JM, Allen BG. Consuming a Ketogenic Diet while Receiving Radiation and Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer and Pancreatic Cancer: The University of Iowa Experience of Two Phase 1 Clinical Trials. Radiat Res. 2017;187(6):743-54.
  30. Zakharia Y, Monga V, Swami U, Bossler AD, Freesmeier M, Frees M, Khan M, Frydenlund N, Srikantha R, Vanneste M, Henry M, Milhem M. Targeting epigenetics for treatment of BRAF mutated metastatic melanoma with decitabine in combination with vemurafenib: A phase lb study. Oncotarget. 2017;8(51):89182-93.
  31. DeZorzi C. Radiation-Induced Coronary Artery Disease and Its Treatment: A Quick Review of Current Evidence. Cardiol Res Pract. 2018;2018:8367268.
  32. DeZorzi C, Fernandez-Ruiz R, Gupta S, Harris K. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy mimicking central nervous system metastases: a case report. J Med Case Rep. 2018;12(1):133.
  33. DeZorzi C, Harris KI. Secret Sarcoma: A Cardiac Mass Disguised as Influenza. Case Rep Cardiol. 2018;2018:8628365.
  34. Garje R, Chau JJ, Chung J, Wanat K, Zakharia Y. Acute Flare of Bullous Pemphigus With Pembrolizumab Used for Treatment of Metastatic Urothelial Cancer. J Immunother. 2018;41(1):42-4.
  35. Vargas Buonfiglio LG, Borcherding JA, Frommelt M, Parker GJ, Duchman B, Vanegas Calderon OG, Fernandez-Ruiz R, Noriega JE, Stone EA, Gerke AK, Zabner J, Comellas AP. Airway surface liquid from smokers promotes bacterial growth and biofilm formation via iron-lactoferrin imbalance. Respir Res. 2018;19(1):42.
  36. Willey J, Mentias A, Vaughan-Sarrazin M, McCoy K, Rosenthal G, Girotra S. Epidemiology of lower extremity peripheral artery disease in veterans. J Vasc Surg. 2018;68(2):527-35 e5.
  37. Ansari MS, Tanaka T, Laroia ST, Sun S. Feasibility of Hepatology-Directed Microwave Ablation in Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in North America: A Pilot Project. Ann Hepatol. 2019;18(1):11-3.
  38. DeZorzi C, Boyle B, Qazi A, Luthra K, Khera R, Chan PS, Girotra S. Administrative Billing Codes for Identifying Patients With Cardiac Arrest. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2019;73(12):1598-600.
  39. Klein M, Khan M, Salinas JL, Sanchez R. Disseminated pulmonary histoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients: a common epidemiological exposure. BMJ Case Rep. 2019;12(3).
  40. Laderian B, Koehn K, Holman C, Lyckholm L, Furqan M. Association of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Programmed Death 1 Checkpoint Inhibitors. J Thorac Oncol. 2019;14(4):e77-e8.
  41. Winward J, Lyckholm L, Brown SM, et al. Case of relapsing sulfasalazine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome upon re-exposure. BMJ Case Reports CP 2020;13:e235803.
  42. Fisher MH, Kirkpatrick GD, Stevens B, Jones C, Callaghan M, Rajpurkar M, Fulbright J, Cooper MA, Rowley J, Porter CC, Gutierrez-Hartmann A, Jones K, Jordan C, Pietras EM, Di Paola J. ETV6 germline mutations cause HDAC3/NCOR2 mislocalization and upregulation of interferon response genes. JCI Insight. 2020 Sep 17;5(18):e140332
  43. Dadwal UC, Maupin KA, Zamarioli A, Tucker A, Harris JS, Fischer JP, Rytlewski JD, Scofield DC, Wininger AE, Bhatti FUR, Alvarez M, Childress PJ, Chakraborty N, Gautam A, Hammamieh R, Kacena MA. The effects of spaceflight and fracture healing on distant skeletal sites. Sci Rep. 2019 Aug 6;9(1):11419
  44. Ravi P, Mantia C, Su C, Sorenson K, Elhag D, et al. Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy of Immunotherapy Rechallenge in Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma. JAMA Oncol. Published online May 29, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.2169
  45. Hammel JA, Elhag D, Ferguson NN. Subungual hemorrhage from an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor. Cutis. 2020;105(1):E15-E16.
  46. Elhag D, Dexter F, Elhakim M, Epstein RH. Many US hospital-affiliated freestanding ambulatory surgery centers are located on hospital campuses, relevant to interpretation of studies involving ambulatory surgery. J Clin Anesth. 2018;49:88-91.
  47. Simms A, Kobayashi T, Endelman L, Sekar P. Disseminated histoplasmosis presenting as bilateral lower extremity paresis. Int J Infect Dis. 2020 Jun;95:265-267
  48. Struble RD, Knox BA, Richter KP, Ellerbeck EF. Insurance coverage and utilization of nicotine patches after receipt of a prescription. Subst Abus 2019;Oct 17:1-4
  49. Hoffman RM, Atallah, R, Struble RD, Badgett RG. Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT: a living systematic review and meta-analysis. J Gen Int Med (accepted for publication June, 2020).

Department Research

Find out who is doing research in Internal Medicine

Learn more about our department's research.

International Health

Several of our residents have taken advantage of the international health experiences offered through our partnerships with other residency programs at the University of Iowa. Here are a few experiences from recent resident rotations.

Mazatlán, Mexico Rotation

During the months of April and November, rotations are available to travel to Mazatlán, Mexico with a group of healthcare professionals. Two weeks of clinical experience are incorporated into the elective, aimed at working within the significantly underserved areas of the city in an ambulatory setting. Depending on your level of fluency, Spanish interpreters are available to assist with history taking and patient counseling. Recreational time is often spent exploring and taking in the sights of the city and Pacific coast while becoming immersed in the local culture.

Alexis Wickersham recounts her experience in Mazatlán, Mexico 

I traveled to Mazatlán, Mexico for a two week outpatient experience, providing free medical evaluation to the city’s underserved populations. [more...]

Additional International Pursuits

Residents who have a passion for international health are also welcome to set up their own independent elective, aimed towards helping them pursue specific career goals. All international health rotations do require prior authorization by the residency program and it is encouraged to start establishing the rotation’s objectives several months in advance. Reimbursement for travel expenses is available for those interested, however, it is not guaranteed for all.

Maria Story's elective in Manali, India

I went to Lady Willington Hospital in Manali, India during my third year of residency for 4 weeks. Manali is a rural hill station (small town) in the state of Himachal Pradesh in north central India. [more...]

Tropical Medicine in rural Ghana - Josiah Zubaru

I spent 2 weeks in the village of Agbozume, Volta Region in Ghana in the Spring of 2017 during my 3rd year of residency. This was my second time visiting and providing healthcare to this community of mostly farmers and traders. [more...]

Juan Caraballo’s elective in Niger

I spent the last 3 weeks and a half in Niamey, Niger. Niger is a landlocked country in West Africa. I worked under the supervision of Dr. Susan Beebout in the Clinique Olivia, a clinic in a poor part of the city associated with Evangelical Church of Niger. [more...]

Click here for additional information.

 

International Health Rotation Elective

The Internal Medicine Residency program offers international elective rotations, which are intended to give the participating house staff member a more global perspective in cultural, social, economic and political issues of another country that may impact that nation’s healthcare system. Learning occurs through both independent study and hands-on experiences. Mentoring by the elective’s director or identified faculty helps the house staff member design the experience to meet the goals and objectives set out in International Elective Policy for Graduate Medical Education.

For questions regarding an international elective during residency, please contact the Residency Program at intmedres@uiowa.edu.

Mexico International Rotation

For my international elective rotation, I traveled to Mazatlán, Mexico for a two week outpatient experience, providing free medical evaluation to the city’s underserved populations. Every day, we traveled to makeshift clinics in churches throughout the city and evaluated anywhere from 80-150 patients per day. Through the help of translators, we conducted thorough histories about current complaints, reviewed current medications and performed a limited physical exam. At the end of the appointment, medications were prescribed, if appropriate. The majority of chronic adult illnesses that were managed included hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and heart disease. Acute medical illnesses were less common, but pyelonephritis and pneumonia were diagnosed in two adults based on only history and clinical exam.

Mexico Rotation

The rotation allowed for a good balance between work and free time. When we were not working, we had the opportunity to explore the city and become immersed in its local culture, including trips to the city center and historic colonial districts, areas enriched by local artists, musicians and beautiful architecture. And with a hotel on the beach, evenings were spent watching the sunset and indulging in fresh local seafood.

Mexico Rotation

This experience gave me a glimpse into global health discrepancies and gave me a greater appreciation for the work that I do and the gift of healing that I am able to share with users. It has inspired me to continue to travel to explore new areas, all the while giving back to those less fortunate and most vulnerable. I look forward to further medical missions that I will be able to take as my career progresses.

- Alexis Wickersham, MD

Mexico Rotation

*Photos Courtesy of Bria Giacomino, DO

India International Rotation

I went to Lady Willington Hospital in Manali, India during my third year of residency for 4 weeks. Manali is a rural hill station (small town) in the state of Himachal Pradesh in north central India. The Lady Willingdon Hospital is a Christian mission hospital that has been serving the local community since 1935. The catchment area is extremely broad, serving patients up to 10 hour drive on poor quality mountainous dirt roads since there is minimal medical infrastructure in the this area (Himalayan Mountains).

I stayed on the hospital campus (they have small rooms available for rotating trainees) and there were several students from the UK also doing an elective rotation. In the morning we did hospital rounds on infants and children, patients hospitalized for medical conditions, and post-surgical patients. In the late morning and through the afternoon we did outpatient clinic, which was essentially an acute care clinic. There is very little chronic disease management or focus on health prevention. Basic laboratory testing and X Rays were available when absolutely indicated. There is also a labor and delivery room (which I did not participate much in, given that I was an Internal Medicine trainee) and an 24-hour Emergency Department.

I saw a wide variety of illnesses, including TB, Scrub Typhus, Entamoeba histolytica, dysentery, a variety of worm infections, and typical bacterial pathogens. There was a high number of accident-related injuries, primarily from MVA’s and unsafe work conditions. Older people presented with respiratory symptoms, probably from some form of obstructive lung disease from smoke exposure from cooking fires and inhaled dust/dirt from hard labor.

Throughout my elective, I was impressed that the staff at Lady Willingdon Hospital were able to provide excellent care with minimal resources by our standards. I did experience a degree of ‘culture shock,’ but overall it was a very valuable experience and I am thankful for the opportunity to travel to India during residency. I felt safe throughout my time in Manali, the scenery was amazing, and I had the opportunity to meet many wonderful people.

Ghana International Rotation

I spent 2 weeks in the village of Agbozume, Volta Region in Ghana in the Spring of 2017 during my 3rd year of residency. This was my second time visiting and providing healthcare to this community of mostly farmers and traders. It was very positive experience for exposure to clinical work, community education and understanding disparities in healthcare access. I was exposed to multiple array of interesting pathology and medical cases, some with very limited resources for further evaluation and management. I had to make grasp of whatever limited options I had to pursue care of these people. Exchanging ideas with local physicians and people in the community was also very educative. I plan to continue to visit Agbozume.

I am thankful that the medicine department could support me in many ways for my trip to Ghana. I will encourage many others with interest in International Health to consider this tremendous opportunity.

Niger International Rotation

I spent the last 3 weeks and a half in Niamey, Niger. Niger is a landlocked country in West Africa. I worked under the supervision of Dr. Susan Beebout in the Clinique Olivia, a clinic in a poor part of the city associated with Evangelical Church of Niger. During my time in Niger I had the unique opportunity to work with an underserved population and with limited resources. I had the opportunity to see and help a broad spectrum of patients with a broad spectrum of pathologies, including diabetes and hypertension, typhoid, tuberculosis, sickle cell disease and many more. I would see around 10-12 patients daily with the help of a medical assistance that will also serve as translator. Most patient speak only their native language (Hausa, Zarma) and only around 20% speak French. Only very limited labs were available and most patients were not able to afford extensive diagnostic work up.

Niger Rotation

Practicing in an environment where laboratories test and imaging are not readily available I learned to trust my history taking and physical exam, and to formulate a clinical assessment with just limited information. Having to serve a population with limited resources strengthen my resourcefulness and taught me about cost-effectiveness in a very direct and practical way.

Niger Rotation

During my rotation in Niger I had the opportunity to spent one week at the National Hospital of Niamey, where I was part of the team taking care of 32 patients in the women general ward. I learn about the logistics of patient care and education in a teaching hospital and the day to day life of my colleagues residents in Niger. Even though the National Hospital is one of the main three hospitals in Niamey, the capital of Niger, there are no ventilators, angiography or MRI, and most medications routinely used in US are not available there, at all. Being able to see the highest level of care that is available in one of the poorest countries in the world, compared with United States, was a humbling and enlightening experience that I feel fortunate to have had and I m positive it has enriched me no only professionally but personally.

Niger Rotation

Fellowship Training and Beyond

Our residents have many choices available to them following their residency training. The Department if Internal Medicine excels in placing residents in subspecialty training in competitive fellowships here and around the country. Residents who elect to go into practice directly find rewarding opportunities available to them, within UI Health Care, in all parts of the country, and in exciting places globally.

The department is committed to developing an individualized career path for each of our trainees. Each resident is given career guidance throughout residency by the Program Director, Associate Program Directors, and faculty mentor(s) of his or her choice. In addition to semi-annual individual meetings with an Associate Program Director, a designated faculty assists residents with securing fellowship training.

From 2014-2018, 55% of our graduates pursued fellowship training, 94% matched obtaining subspecialty fellowship positions in many of the finest programs nationwide (see below). 32% of these graduates chose to stay at University of Iowa for their fellowship training, attesting to resident satisfaction with the educational environment, hospital system, and collegiality. Over the past five years, 37% of graduating residents remained in general internal medicine, taking positions as hospitalists and primary care physicians at University of Iowa and across the country.

Destinations of 2020 Graduates

Fellowship Training Institutions (2015-2020)

Allergy/Immunology
Medical Colege of Wisconsin
University of Colorado
University of Iowa
Washington University, St. Louis
Cardiology
Medical College of Wisconsin
The Ohio State University
University of Iowa
University of Minnesota
University of North Carolina
University of South Florida 
University of Texas Southwestern
University of Washington
Virginia Commonwealth University
Wake Forest
Washington University, St. Louis
Endocrinology
University of Iowa
University of Wisconsin
Gastroenterology
Boston University
Cleveland Clinic
Indiana University
Medical College of Wisconsin
St. Louis University
SUNY
The Ohio State University
Tulane
University of Iowa
University of New Mexico 
University of Wisconsin
Hematology/Oncology
Gundersen Health System
St. Louis University
University of Iowa
Washington University, St. Louis
Infectious Diseases
University of Minnesota
University of Iowa
Nephrology
University of Iowa
University of Pennsylvania
Washington University, St. Louis
Palliative Medicine
University of Iowa
Pulmonary/Critical Care
Boston University
Duke University
University of California, San Francisco 
University of Iowa
University of Michigan
University of Pennsylvania  
Washington University, St. Louis
Rheumatology
New York University
St. Louis University
University of Iowa


Destinations of 2020 Graduates

Allergy-Immunology
University of Iowa

Cardiology
University of Iowa (2)
University of Minnesota (2)
Wake Forest
The Ohio State University
Washington University, St. Louis

Gastroenterology
University of Iowa
Indiana University
Tulane
The Ohio State University
SUNY

Hematology/Oncology
University of Iowa
Gundersen Health System

Infectious Disease
University of Iowa

Nephrology
University of Iowa

Pulmonary-Critical Care
University of Iowa

Rheumatology
University of Iowa
Saint Louis University

Where Are They Now?

Read about where some of our program graduates have landed in our Where Are They Now series! 
Check back often for additional profiles.


Sheena CarlLee, MD
(R '17, CR '18)

Nicole Fleege, MD
(R '18, CR '19)


Robert Leon-Ferre, MD
(R '13, CR '14)

Lori Rosenstein, MD
(R '06, CR '07, F '09)



Aaron Vose, MD
(R '17, CR '18)

Committees

Residents are encouraged to participate in one of our committees:

Resident Liaison Committee

The Resident Liaison Committee (RLC) is comprised of 15-18 residents that serve as representatives for the entire cohort of residents. The committee provides a forum for residents to voice concerns directly with program administration, and participate in the ongoing evolution of the residency program and curriculum. The committee also organizes social events throughout the year.

Committee Responsibilities

  1. Act as a voice for all residents and provide an opportunity to raise concerns
  2. Serve as a communication link between residents and program administration
  3. Participate in the ongoing review of the residency program and curriculum
  4. Support resident wellness through sponsorship of social events
Click image for larger view.

 

 

Program Evaluation Committee

The Internal Medicine Residency Program Evaluation Committee (PEC) is charged with ensuring the quality of the residency program by overseeing program evaluation, design and improvement.

Committee Responsibilities:

  1. Plan, design and evaluate educational activities
  2. Review curriculum goals and objectives
  3. Monitor faculty development and resident and graduate performance
  4. Use evaluation data to improve the program
Click image for larger view.

Wellness and Humanities Committee

The Resident Wellness Committee is comprised of residents in different stages of the program, one chief resident, and one faculty. The goal of the committee is to establish a formal framework by which to improve wellness and cohesion between residents and the residency program. The committee aims to facilitate team-building by way of mentorship and wellness events.

Committee Responsibilities

  1. To improve resident and program cohesion
  2. To provide education on the importance of physician well-being and professional satisfaction   
  3. To organize regular wellness events to facilitate the above goals
Click image for larger view.

Resident Wellness

The University of Iowa Internal Medicine Residency strongly believes that resident wellness is integral to our mission of excellence in patient care and in training physicians who are prepared for a fulfilling, life-long career in the path of their choosing. We utilize a diverse set of opportunities and activities to help keep residents happy and healthy, while ensuring easy access to further services if needs arise.

Wellness:

Transition into Residency

  1. Orientation to Foundation of Medicine for safe patient care - a series of lectures and workshops targeting medical knowledge and skills early in their training
  2. Peer Mentoring Program - Each incoming intern is paired with a senior resident mentor to support a smooth transition to residency
  3. Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA)-based Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) - administered during intern orientation week and helps drive individualized clinical skills coaching
  4. Resident-to-Resident Epic Training during GME Orientation (Epic Training for Residents by Residents) - ability to be “ready on day one”

Encourage Connections between Peers, Faculty and within Interprofessional Teams      

  1. Welcome Gathering Picnic during Orientation Week
  2. Annual Resident Workshops/Retreats - There are retreats held annually for residents at all levels of training. These are held off-site and provide a break from the wards with an opportunity to improve team building skills and get to know your fellow residents.
  3. Wellness and Humanities Committee - focuses on physical, emotional and social well-being including organization of social events
  4. Internal Medicine Winter Recognition Social Gathering for Residents - held in January/February of every year to celebrate residents and their contribution to the Program
  5. GME House Staff Council Activities
  6. Residents Graduation Party - graduation party in the spring of each year
  7. Food Truck Thursday - weekly during the warm weather months giving residents the opportunity to enjoy the food trucks and local music onsite
  8. Community Activity/Resource List

Close Monitoring by Program Director/Associate Program Directors/Chief Residents

  1. House Staff Meeting with the Resident Leadership – monthly meeting to discuss program updates, and resident input regarding the educational program
  2. Chief Resident Mentorship Program
  3. Resident Liaison Committee - provides an effective outlet to voice resident needs and concerns

Encourage Healthy Lifestyle and to Seek Timely Healthcare Services

  1. Healthcare Benefits
  2. Resident Lounge and Workout Equipment/Facilities - incentive-based gym memberships (decreased rate based on number of times attended) to both the on-site recreation center or the Campus Recreation and Wellness Center
  3. Healthy Food Choices - Prepared lunches are provided at no cost to residents daily, including vegetarian and gluten free options
  4. Internal Medicine Residency Program and Employee Assistance Program (EAP) partnership
  5. Time Off for Healthcare Services
  6. Other Wellness Resources
    1. UI LiveWell program
    2. UI Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
    3. Cab/taxi program - for residents who do not feel like they are able to drive back home

PDF icon2019-2020 Wellness Plan

How to Apply

ERAS logo

Apply using the Electronic Residency Application System (ERAS), and register with the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP).

We accept applications September 15 through December 31, and selected candidates will be invited to interview. We recommend you apply early.

A limited number of categorical positions are occasionally available at the PGY-2 level.

We welcome applicants who will graduate from qualified medical school programs in this country or abroad. Please note our eligibility criteria.

Supplemental ERAS Application Form: Our Internal Medicine Residency Program will be accepting the ERAS Supplemental Form for the 2021-2022 application season. We are NOT requiring this form to be completed. As this is a new component of the application, we are using this year as a “pilot” to determine how to best use the form. We do not anticipate this form to change our overall process for selecting candidates for interviews and hope that by simply applying to our program, you are showing interest in our program.

Thank you for your interest in our program. If you have any questions, please contact us at intmedres@uiowa.edu or (319) 384-9668.

Training Program Eligibility Criteria

U.S. Allopathic Medical School Graduates

  • Completed USMLE Step 1 and 2
  • Application via the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) including:
    • A minimum of three letters of recommendation 
    • Dean’s letter (MSPE)
    • Medical school transcript
    • Personal statement
    • Photograph (optional)

Osteopathic Medical School Graduates

  • Completed COMLEX Step 1 and Step 2 OR USMLE Step 1 and 2
  • Application via the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) including:
    • A minimum of three letters of recommendation
    • Dean’s letter (MSPE)
    • Medical school transcript
    • Personal statement
    • Photograph (optional)

International Medical School Graduates

  • Completed and passed USMLE Step 1, Step 2, and Step 2 CS on first attempt. Scores must be available before you can be considered for an interview.
  • Hands on Clinical Experience in the United States medical system (this does NOT include observerships)
  • Application via the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) including:
    • A minimum of three letters of recommendation
    • Dean’s letter (MSPE)
    • Medical school transcript verifying appropriate medical education to train in a large teaching hospital
    • Personal statement
    • Photograph (optional)
  • U.S. citizenship or J-1 Visa

The Interview

We will interview selected candidates October through January. The night before your interview, you will be invited to join current residents for dinner in Iowa City. This is an informal time to get to know our residents and learn more about the program and life in Iowa City. On the day of your interview, you will receive a personalized schedule. Your day will start with an overview of the program, followed by interviews with our program director, an associate program directory, and a member of the UIHC faculty. We strive to match you with a faculty interviewer in your field of interest, if known. Between interviews, you will join a guided tour of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and have time to relax and chat with current residents. Following your interviews, you will join our residents for our Noon Conference and participate in a Chief Resident led Case Conference. After conference, there will be a short wrap up; we plan for the day to end by 2:30pm.

Our People

Internal Medicine Residency Program 2019
(no class photo taken in 2020)

Our faculty members make up the largest department at UI Health Care. We are a department rich in tradition and long on talent in our important mission of teaching, caring, and discovering new understandings in medicine. As teachers and mentors, our goal is to bring out your best as a physician.

Your fellow residents are, just like you, dedicated to rewarding and meaningful careers in the practice of medicine. They come to Iowa from around the world, drawn here by a comprehensive training program, outstanding work environment, and the prospect of practice opportunities and further training afforded by their experiences here.

Our patients are also part of the training equation. They come to University of Iowa Health Care to receive the very best care from experts who are passionate about delivering it in a personable way. As Iowa’s only academic medical center, we see a comprehensive mix of challenging cases and have the privilege to work with many cultures and languages. 

 

Department Contacts

For information regarding Categorical and Preliminary Programs contact:


Cindy K. Batzkiel 
Program Administrator
Department of Internal Medicine 
200 Hawkins Dr., E325 GH 
Iowa City, IA 52242 
Phone: (319)356-2034 
FAX: (319)384-8955
Email: intmedres@uiowa.edu

Abbey Gilpin
Associate Program Administrator
Department of Internal Medicine
200 Hawkins Dr., E323 GH 
Iowa City, IA 52242 
Phone: (319)384-9668
FAX: (319)384-8955
Email: intmedres@uiowa.edu

1st Year Class

Roshan Abid
Roshan Abid, MD
University of Iowa
Prelim-Dermatology
S. Bilal Ahmed
Bilal Ahmed, MD
University of Toledo
Prelim-Ophthalmology
Mazen Aiche
Mazen Aiche, MD
University of Arizona

Rachel Anderson
Rachel Anderson, MD
University of Minnesota
Alex Cuskey
Alex Cuskey, MD
University of Wisconsin
Solanus de la Serna
Solanus de la Serna, MD
Case Western Reserve University

McKenna Eisenbeisz
McKenna Eisenbeisz, MD
University of South Dakota
Marie Finkbeiner
Marie Finkbeiner, MD
University of Washington
Arnie Garza Reyes
Arnie Garza Reyes, MD
Texas Tech University
Prelim-Ophthalmology

Daniel Goering
Daniel Goering, MD
Saint Louis University
Jeff Johnson
Jeff Johnson, MD
Florida State University
Chad Lewis
Cy Lewis, MD, MPH
Dartmouth University
Prelim-Ophthalmology

Sarah Little
Sarah Little, MD
West Virginia University – Charleston
(Medicine-Psychiatry)
Patrick Mallea
Patrick Mallea, MD
University of Utah
Luke Morrey
Luke Morrey, MD
University of Minnesota

Truman Nguyen
Truman Nguyen, MD
University of Wisconsin
Alex Paschke
Alex Paschke, MD
Western Michigan University
Shivali Patel
Shivali Patel, MD
Rush University
(Medicine-Psychiatry)

Sruti Prathivadhi-Bhayankaram
Sruti Prathivadhi-Bhayankaram, MD
University of Nebraska
Haley Pysick
Haley Pysick, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin
Adi Ravindra
Adi Ravindra, MD
University of Illinois - Peoria

 Michael Sauer
Michael Sauer, MD
University of Utah
Zak Sharif-Sidi
Zak Sharif-Sidi, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin
Prelim-Derm
Michael Shlossman
Michael Shlossman, MD
Virginia Tech

Joanna Silverman
Joanna Silverman, MD
University of Iowa
Prelim-Ophthalmology
John Smestad
John Smestad, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic - Rochester
PSTP
Raghav Tripathi
Raghav Tripathi, MD, MPH
Case Western Reserve University
Prelim-Dermatology

Sarah Van Dorin
Sarah Van Dorin, MD
University of Iowa
Madalyn Walsh
Madalyn Walsh, MD
University of Iowa
Cheryl Wang
Cheryl Wang, MD
University of Iowa
Prelim-Ophthalmology

Cory Wilson
Cory Wilson, MD, PhD
University of Texas - Houston
PSTP
Tong Yu
Tong Yu, MD
University of Iowa
Lauren Zabel
Lauren Zabel, MD
University of Kansas

Jeremy Zhang
Jeremy Zhang, MD
University of Illinois

2nd Year Class

Christian Anderson
Christian Anderson, MD, PhD
Case Western Reserve University
PSTP
Taylor Becker
Taylor Becker, MD
Central Michigan University
Stephen Brennan
Stephen Brennan, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin
(Medicine-Psychiatry)

Taylor Cox
Taylor Cox, MD
University of Iowa
Jon Day
Jon Day, MD
Southern Illinois University
Josh Denk
Joshua Denk, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin

Dave Dimachkie
Dave Dimachkie, MD
University of Kansas
Katelin Durham
Katelin Durham, MD
University of Iowa
Aron Evans
Aron Evans, MD
University of Iowa

Alex Garza
Alex Garza, MD
University of Iowa
Rachel Genova
Rachel Genova, MD, PhD
University of Iowa
PSTP
Antony Gout
Antony Gout, MD
University of Iowa
(Medicine-Psychiatry)

Reed Johnson
Reed Johnson, MD
University of Iowa
Alicia Kilian
Alicia Killian, MD
University of Minnesota
(Medicine-Psychiatry)
Greg Kirkpatrick
Greg Kirkpatrick, MD, PhD
University of Colorado
PSTP

Erin Meyers
Erin Meyers, MD
University of Iowa
Stephen Peltier
Stephen Peltier, MD
Western Michigan University
Shahana Prakash
Shahana Prakash, MD
Ohio State University

Adam Prescott
Adam Prescott, MD
Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University
Mahak Saad
Mahak Saad, MD
University of Texas Health Science Center
Erin Sternhagen
Erin Sternhagen, MD
University of South Dakota

Colten Stewart
Colten Stewart, MD
Wright State University
Stephen Stone
Stephen Stone, MD
University of California, San Francisco
Naomi Vather
Naomi Vather-Wu, MD
University of Iowa

Arya Zandvakili
Arya Zandvakili, MD, PhD
University of Cincinnati
PSTP
Kathie Zhang
Kathie Zhang, MD
University of Arizona

3rd Year Class

Ahmed Abdelhamid
Ahmed Abdelhamid, MD
University of Missouri - Columbia
Matt Becker
Matt Becker, MD
University of Iowa
Tyler Bullis
Tyler Bullis, MD
University of Kansas

Benny Chang
Benny Chang, MD
University of Pittsburgh
Adil Hassan
Adil Hassan, MD
University of Missouri - Kansas City
Mackenzie Hines
Mackenzie Hines, MD
University of Iowa

Nathan Hocker
Nathaniel Hocker, MD
Southern Illinois University
Chermaine Hung
Chermaine Hung, MD
University of Iowa
Ian Kidder
Ian Kidder, MD
University of Iowa

Wendy Liu
Wendy Liu, MD
University of Miami
Paul Mester
Paul Mester, MD
University of South Carolina
Emily Nguyen
Emily Nguyen, MD, PhD
University of Iowa

David Olafsson
David Olafsson, MD
University of Iceland
Sean Pickthorn
Sean Pickthorn, MD
University of South Dakota
Tommy Robinson
Tommy Robinson, MD
University of Kansas

Jared Robl
Jared Robl, MD
University of Kansas
Evelyn Ross-Shapiro
Evelyn Ross-Shapiro, MD
University of Iowa
Lola Saliu
Ololade "Lola" Saliu, MD
University of Pittsburgh
(Medicine-Psychiatry)

John Salomone
John Salomone, MD
Saint Louis University
Ashwin Subramani
Ashwin Subramani, MD
University of Iowa
Robert Windisch
Rob Windisch, Jr., MD
Creighton University

Jason Winward
Jason Winward, MD
University of Utah
Quijun Yu
Qiujun Yu, MD, PhD
Fourth Military Medical University
Samuel Zetumer
Samuel Zetumer, MD
University of California - San Francisco

4th and 5th Year Classes

Brigid Adviento
Brigid Adviento, MD, MPH
Tulane University
(Medicine-Psychiatry)
Hashim Chaudhry
Hashim Chaudhry, MD
University of Kentucky
(Medicine-Psychiatry)

Gechi Obiano
Gechi Obiano, MD
University of Texas HSC Houston
(Medicine-Psychiatry)
Lisa Wehr
Lisa Wehr Maves, MD, MPH
University of Iowa
(Medicine-Psychiatry)

Chief Residents

Desmond Barber, MD
University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita
desmond-barber@uiowa.edu

Growing up in Wichita, Kansas, I was fortunate enough to watch my dad serve our community as a firefighter and EMT. I saw the dedication and pride he took in his job as well as the respect that he earned in our community. I remember the stories people would tell me about the ways he impacted their lives and helped them and I knew I wanted to follow his example. He was also an EMT in a local emergency room and my family would often take him dinner. This was my earliest exposure to the medical field and I was fascinated. These experiences and my love for science in school influenced my decision to become a doctor and I never looked back.

After graduating from Wichita State University, I went to medical school at the University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, where I became heavily involved in different organizations and activities. I was able to give back to a community that had given me so much through my involvement with our student-run free healthcare clinic, the JayDoc Community Clinic, and I cultivated and grew my love for teaching by acting as a supplemental instructor.

When I began my search for a residency program a mentor told me that I had to check out the University of Iowa. At the time I didn’t make much of it and added it to my list, but in retrospect, it was one of the best decisions of my life. I was completely blown away on my interview day. It was obvious that Iowa was a program like few others. I was struck by the sense of camaraderie and their enthusiasm for learning. It was apparent that the residents and leadership had worked hard to create that culture and I wanted to be a part of it.

My time here has been phenomenal. I have been continually challenged and grew more than I could have ever imagined, all while feeling completely supported by my co-residents, fellows, faculty, and administration. As a Chief Resident, I will direct my efforts toward further advancements in our amazing ultrasound curriculum, while continuing to cultivate our love for teaching and learning.

Outside of work I enjoy spending time with friends and family, playing/watching sports, traveling and spending time outside. Following this year I plan to pursue a fellowship in Pulmonary/Critical Care.


Sydney Bowmaster, MD
University of Nebraska College of Medicine
sydney-bowmaster@uiowa.edu

I grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska, and knew I wanted to pursue a career in medicine from a young age. After high school, I ventured to the east coast to attend college at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. While at Duke, I saw an opportunity to expand my cultural knowledge base and received my Bachelor of Arts in Religion while still fostering my love for science through pursuing minors in both Biology and Chemistry. Additionally, my experiences competing on the varsity women’s rowing team taught me the value of perseverance and teamwork.

Following completion of my undergraduate education, I returned to the Midwest to work briefly as an Emergency Medical Technician before attending medical school at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. While in medical school, I appreciated how my Internal Medicine rotations allowed for an in-depth application of scientific knowledge coupled with the patient relationships and continuity of care that are crucial to the art of medicine. I immediately felt at home at the University of Iowa on my residency interview day, and I am consistently grateful for the program’s unparalleled education and mentorship as well as the family of co-residents I have had the privilege of working with these past few years. The Internal Medicine Residency Program at Iowa has helped shape me as a physician and educator, and I am excited to join this next group of leaders as the Education Chief Resident.

Outside of work, I love spending time outdoors with my husband and our two dogs. We enjoy biking, running, cross country skiing, and traveling. In the summer months, we also like to take advantage of Iowa City’s local farmer’s markets and festivals, or spend a weekend water skiing and fishing on Coralville Reservoir and Lake Macbride. As Chief Resident, I plan to build resident confidence and leadership skills in managing urgent and emergent patient care scenarios. I also hope to promote a longitudinal exposure to interactive board-style questions and case discussions. Upon completion of my chief year, I plan to pursue fellowship training in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.


Derek Hupp, MD
University of Nebraska College of Medicine
derek-hupp@uiowa.edu

I first considered a career in medicine after completing a high school summer internship focused on shadowing physicians in a local emergency department and dialysis center. Getting to interview patients on dialysis and obtain data related to their quality of life provided me an early look at how significant chronic illness can greatly affect people’s lives. After graduating high school in my hometown of Lincoln, Nebraska, I moved downtown to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with the primary objective of playing alto saxophone in the Cornhusker Marching Band (Go Big Red!). A degree in Global Studies led to further education at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.

At UNMC, incredible mentors in Internal Medicine showed me how exciting, intellectually challenging, and fun caring for adults across the life course could be. On the interview trail, I was immediately drawn to the strong camaraderie and positive attitude of the leadership and residents here at the University of Iowa. Matching at Iowa has without a doubt helped me grow significantly in every area of my life—I have even started cheering for the Hawkeyes.

I am so excited to work this year as our VA’s Chief Resident in Quality and Safety. My focus will be on reducing breakdowns in transitions of care from an inpatient stay back to our outpatient clinics. Outside of the hospital I enjoy road-tripping to see family in Nebraska and Minnesota with my wife, Samara, and our new dog, Louie. I also love hiking, camping in local state parks, and learning something new about the world every day. After completion of chief residency, I plan to work as an academic general internist.


Yana Zemkova, MD
University of New Mexico School of Medicine
yana-zemkova@uiowa.edu

My medical school personal statement told a true story of a young child racing with an encyclopedia into a closed screen door, as a way to demonstrate my youthful excitement for learning. This same eagerness paved my way through an undergraduate degree in Biology and Spanish, with a side of managerial work at a gymnastics school, with the ultimate goal of medicine.

My medical school experience at the University of New Mexico initially claimed an interest in Emergency Medicine. Apparently, my closest friends always knew that I was bound for internal medicine instead, but I pushed back. The first week of my IM rotation however, I stayed until 7:30pm on an inpatient VA service and was convinced – I never looked back from the special sort of hours-long rounds, complex decision-making, and diagnostic dilemmas. From the very beginning of my love of inpatient internal medicine, I also developed an interest in medical education. In my fourth year of med school, I completed a student adaptation of the Stanford Course in Clinical Teaching and then served as a student coordinator organizing and creating sessions for a month-long rotation for students transitioning from pre-clinical to clinical years.

If you had asked me four years ago where I would go for residency, I would have never believed that Iowa would be the answer. Allow me to provide some cliches that serve perfectly to describe my interview experience: “when you know, you know,” “it just felt right,” and “it was a good fit.” What I left my interview with was a sense of belonging, accomplishment, and encouragement, and my training here has lived up to every expectation with which I entered. The University of Iowa has provided me with a multitude of mentors, an unparalleled foundation with a focus on clinical reasoning, a blossoming skillset with ultrasound, an involvement with program development, physicians to emulate, and countless memories – all in part during a pandemic, yet without sacrificing any patient care. From the original Land of Enchantment with mountains and green chile, to this slightly flatter and colder one, I have been captivated. I look forward to participating in the recruitment process to showcase the program’s accomplishments as well as the meaning behind being a member of the Hawkeye family. Following this, I will pursue a fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care, with an ongoing focus in medical education. But what’s in my life besides medicine? I am expanding my wine palate, I enjoy all and any desserts, I can quote New Girl for any situation, and I have a love of miniature schnauzers (although I do not yet personally have one – chief goal perhaps!).

 

Residency Program Administration

Manish Suneja, MD
Vice Chair for Education
Director, Residency Program 
Department of Internal Medicine


Brian K. Gehlbach, M.D.

Brian K. Gehlbach, MD
Associate Director, Residency Program 
Department of Internal Medicine


Katherine I. Harris, MD
Associate Director, Residency Program 
Department of Internal Medicine


Krista Johnson, MD
Associate Director, Residency Program
Department of Internal Medicine


Justin Smock, MD
Associate Director, Residency Program 
Department of Internal Medicine


Scott A. Vogelgesang, MD
Associate Director, Residency Program 
Department of Internal Medicine


Mark C. Wilson, M.D., M.P.H.

Mark C. Wilson, MD, MPH
Associate Dean, Graduate Medical Education 
Department of Internal Medicine


Andrew Bryant

Andrew Bryant, MD
Assistant Director, Residency Program
Department of Internal Medicine


Carly Kuehn, MD
Educational Director, Safety and Quality
Department of Internal Medicine


Jane S. Rowat, BS, MS
Education Development Director
Department of Internal Medicine


Medicine-Psychiatry Program

Vicki J. Kijewski, MD
Director, Medicine-Psychiatry Residency Program 
Departments of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry


Physician Scientist Training Pathwy (PSTP)

David Stoltz, MD, PhD
Director, Physician Scientist Training Program
Department of Internal Medicine


 

Chair and Department Executive Officer

This is an extraordinary time in your life, a transition that marks the beginning of a crucial new period in your professional career and in your personal experience. When I went about interviewing for and choosing my residency, I was a bit anxious but mostly very excited. I knew it would be hard work, but I looked forward to the challenge as I am sure you do now.

I sincerely believe that you stand at the beginning of one of the most exciting times in the history of medicine. After decades of research in human disease we have begun to see a novel array of new therapies that will rapidly expand in the near future. The Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa has contributed in countless ways to this new world of discovery, remedy, and hope. As chair of the department, my goal is ensure that we remain in the forefront not just of change but of important science, meaningful education, and the best patient care available anywhere -- all of this in a stimulating environment of cultural and intellectual diversity.

Among my highest priorities is to see that our residency program continues in its position as one of the premier programs in the nation. Dr. Manish Suneja spearheads this effort, maintaining a training curriculum and a learning environment that thoroughly prepares you for the next level in your career. At the same time we are committed to helping you learn how to preserve a meaningful balance between work and home, a skill that will shape every part of your life.

I foresee tremendous growth and unlimited possibilities in internal medicine at Iowa, and I urge you to join us in Iowa City. In this remarkable and heterogeneous community, you'll find the breadth, depth, and diversity of patients and world-renowned and caring faculty and staff, and outstanding facilities to make your education a success. Look over our website, visit Iowa City, and compare us with other programs. Don't hesitate to contact Dr. Suneja or me if you have questions about Iowa City or about internal medicine at the University of Iowa.

E. Dale Abel, MD, PhD
Chair & Department Executive Officer
Department of Internal Medicine
Francois M. Abboud Chair in Internal Medicine
John B. Stokes III Chair in Diabetes Research 
Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry

Resident Life

Intern Orientation

Intern Orientation is a week-long introduction to UIHC and our residency program.  It provides a wonderful opportunity to become familiar with UIHC, the VAMC, and enjoy meeting new colleagues.  Interns receive training in the electronic medical record systems at both UIHC and the VAMC, orientation to their assigned Continuity of Care Clinics, and access to vital resources that will help their intern year be a successful one.  Team building activities provide a fun opportunity to get to know fellow interns.

Read about A Day in the Life of our residents.

Welcome Picnic

At the close of intern orientation, a welcome picnic is held for the new interns and their families. All residents and faculty are invited to attend.

  

Resident Workshops

Each year, a 1-day off-campus workshop for each residency class is organized to provide further skill development in the areas of communication, teaching, leadership, team-building, wellness and self-development. Each workshop is purposefully planned to provide didactic and interactive sessions, which address topics most pertinent to the level of the resident participant.

 

Winter Recognition Event 

The Internal Medicine Residency hosts an annual winter gathering at a local establishment to recognize the hard work and dedication of our residents.  It is a welcome time to relax and enjoy time away from the hospital with friends and colleagues.

     

Graduating House Staff Dinner

In June, the department hosts a farewell dinner program honoring the graduating residents and celebrating their accomplishments. The residents' selection of Faculty Teacher of the Year is also recognized at this event.

     

After Hours

Social events and fun activities are facilitated by the close proximity of the downtown Iowa City area and the open, welcoming resident community.  There are multiple social events throughout the year that are planned by the Resident Council, a group consisting of elected representatives from each of the residency programs at the University of Iowa.

 There are many interest groups that are available to our residents as part of the University community: UIHC Writers’ Group, Internal Medicine Book Club, faculty/staff orchestra are a few examples.