Infectious Disease Fellowship

Infectious Disease Infographic

About the Program

The Infectious Disease Fellowship at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics has the following aims:

  • To train diverse Infectious Disease experts who are exemplary physicians.  Principles that derive from prudent antimicrobial stewardship, the epidemiology of infections, medical microbiology, immunology, health equity and disease prevention will inform their service to patients and healthcare institutions.
  • To train physicians who are equipped to lead health care teams that optimize patient safety and healthcare quality/delivery.
  • To train physician-scholars who increase medical/scientific knowledge in Infectious Disease and related fields through research and publication.
  • To train dedicated physician-educators who enthusiastically transmit the knowledge and skills listed in Missions 1-3.

Schedule

Clinical Requirements or Elective Options

  • Twelve months of clinical training (in- and outpatient rotations) divided between the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics (major component) and the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VA); Eight or nine of these twelve months are completed during the first year and include Transplant rotations
  • Two to Four weeks Clinical Microbiology rotation and twice weekly Micro tutorials
  • 1/2 day per 2 weeks Continuity of Care ID clinic at UI Hospitals & Clinics
  • 1/2 day per 2 weeks Continuity of Care HIV clinic at UI Hospitals & Clinics
  • Antimicrobial Stewardship/Hospital Epidemiology: 1 week each with additional elective time
  • Transplant ID (Solid Organ and Hem/BMT): 4 scheduled weeks during both year 1 and 2; additional elective time available
  • Travel clinics: four with option for additional clinics
  • Hepatology clinics: four to six
  • Electives available:  Orthopedics ID, Pediatrics ID, Allergy-Immunology, Dermatology, Addiction Medicine

Conferences/Meetings

Infectious Disease Grand Rounds (weekly): Two cases are presented by the fellows or staff as unknowns, discussed, and pertinent literature reviewed

 

  • Infectious Disease Grand Rounds (weekly): Two cases are presented by the fellows or staff as unknowns, discussed, and pertinent literature reviewed
  • Core Curriculum Conference (weekly): didactic lectures on general and specialty ID topics over 2 year cycle (See Curriculum for more details on topics)
  • Journal Club (monthly)
  • Research Conference (weekly): progress on ongoing ID related research activity is presented by faculty and fellows
  • Departmental Interdisciplinary Fellows' Curriculum (twice-monthly): presentations on common requirements of the Internal Medicine fellowship programs including ethics, coding and billing, statistics, sleep deprivation, practice management, etc. [view schedule]
  •  ID Week and second meeting of fellows' choice, such as SHEA meeting
  • University of Iowa Update in Infectious Disease Regional CME Meeting (annual)
  • Various multi-disciplinary conferences, including Morbidity/Mortality Conference for Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine Grand Rounds, etc.
  • ID Resident Curriculum Case-based Module facilitation (monthly): 2nd year fellows
  • Clinical Microbiology sessions twice per week with Team 1   

Clinical Activities

The Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program at the University of Iowa is ACGME accredited for two years, at the end of which the fellow will meet ABIM eligibility requirements.  

Clinical training is concentrated in the first year of the program.  Clinical assignments occur primarily at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics (UIHC), with lesser activity at the Iowa City VA Health Care System which is located across the street.  Transplant ID and HIV Care, in addition to broad general ID training, are critical components of the fellow experience.

Clinical Rotations/Blocks

  • Team 1 General ID: UIHC inpatient consult service (medical, surgical, ICU). This service typically performs 120-140 new consults per month.
  • Team 2 General ID: Outpatient consults combined with inpatient consults using an apprenticeship model of attending/fellow staffing
  • Clinical Microbiology: Intensive instruction and hands-on experience with the Director of the UIHC Medical Microbiology Laboratory and other lab staff
  • COC Infectious Diseases and COC Virology (HIV) clinics each clinic every 2 weeks for 1st two years of fellowship
  • Transplant ID
  • Antimicrobial Stewardship
  • Hospital Epidemiology
  • Hepatology Clinic
  • Travel Clinic
  • Allergy/Immunology Service (Elective)
  • Pediatric Infectious Disease (Elective)
  • Dermatology Service (Elective)
  • Ortho ID (Elective)
  • Addiction Medicine (Elective)

Curriculum

The Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program at the University of Iowa is ACGME accredited for two years, at the end of which the fellow will meet ABIM eligibility requirements.  

Clinical training is concentrated in the first year of the program.  Clinical Rotations occur primarily at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics and with lesser activity at the Iowa City VA Health Care System, which is located across the street from UI Hospitals & Clinics.  During this year each fellow selects a faculty mentor and scholarly project.   The mention will guide his/her research activity and development during the second and possible third year.

Core Curriculum Topics

Clinical topics

  1. HIV
  2. Travel & Tropical Medicine (Parasitology)
  3. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Prevention
  4. Principles of prophylaxis: vaccination
  5. Common community-acquired infections
  6. Infections in immunocompromised hosts, including solid organ transplant and Hematopoietic Transplant
  7. Tuberculosis and atypical mycobacterial infections
  8. Organ System Infections of CNS, head & neck, respiratory, urogenital tract, etc.
  9. Sexually transmitted infections/Reproductive tract infections
  10. Vector-borne illness
  11. Viral, fungal, mycobacterial, and bacterial infections
  12. Fever of unknown origin
  13. Pharmacy topics: including pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles of antimicrobial prescribing, outpatient antimicrobial therapy, antimicrobial resistance, etc.
  14. Primary immunodeficiency syndromes
  15. Zoonoses
  16. Health-care associated syndromes
  17. Immunodeficiency syndromes
  18. Toxin-mediated syndromes
  19. Antimicrobial stewardship
  20. Microbiology and lab diagnostics
  21. Dermatologic manifestations of infections
  22. Quality improvement

Clinical Experience

Fellows will have clinical experience and demonstrate competence in the evaluation and management of infections in patients with major impairments of host defense:

  1. Patients who are neutropenic due to malignancies and their treatments
  2. Patients with solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplantation
  3. Patients with HIV/AIDS or immunocompromised by other diseases or their treatments

Fellows will have clinical experience and demonstrate competence in the evaluation and management of patients with the following disorders and clinical situations involving:

  1. Breadth of organ system infections (eg, cardiovascular, CNS, bone and joints, etc)
  2. Infections of devices or hardware
  3. Sepsis or trauma requiring Intensive Care (Medical, Surgical, Neurosurgical, Cardiovascular ICUs)
  4. Healthcare-associated infections
  5. Array of pathogens (Viral, Fungal, Mycobacterial, Parasitic, Bacterial)
  6. Infections in pregnancy
  7. Fever of unknown origin
  8. Optimal use of antibiotics (efficacy, safety, resources, utilization)
  9. Outpatient antibiotics
  10. Infection Prevention

Fellowship Tracks

Clinical/Clinician-Educator Track

Clinical/Clinician-Educator Track:  to prepare fellows for a career as an ID consultant and educator either in a private or academic setting:

  1. Elective rotations in addition to those of the standard curriculum include those listed as electives under “Clinical Activities”
  2. Antimicrobial Stewardship/Hospital Epidemiology electives, including participation in Infection Prevention Workgroup Meetings
  3. IDSA Membership and during the second year, attendance at IDWeek
  4. SHEA membership, if desired
  5. Nomination to participate in IDSA Clinical Fellows Meeting or other clinical meeting of fellows’ choice
  6. Participation in Department of Medicine Fellows as Clinician Educator Program (FACE), year 2, if desired
  7. Tropical medicine opportunity (Brazil, India, Thailand)
  8. Internal Medicine Resident ID curriculum teaching sessions, year 2
  9. Participation in UIHC Quality Leadership Academy

Healthcare/Hospital Epidemiology and Clinical Investigation Track

Healthcare/Hospital Epidemiology and Clinical Investigation Track:  to prepare fellows as ID consultants with special emphasis in Hospital Epidemiology, Antimicrobial Stewardship and/or Clinical Investigation, especially at an academic medical center.

  1. SHEA, IDSA membership
  2. Attendance at SHEA meeting or 2nd meeting of fellow’s choice related to Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Prevention
  3. Attendance at IDWeek during year 2
  4. Rotations in Antimicrobial Stewardship and Hospital Epidemiology in addition to the standard curriculum and attendance at Hospital-Wide Infection Prevention workgroup meetings. Involvement in outreach investigations and other longitudinal activities of Infection Prevention/Hospital Epidemiology programs
  5. Participation in University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics focused work groups to reduce healthcare-associated infections
  6. Scholarly project in Healthcare/Hospital Epidemiology, Process Improvement, Clinical Investigation or Computational Epidemiology (see research page)
  7. MPH or Masters of Science in Clinical Investigation, if academic career planned, during 3rd and 4th years
  8. Nomination for VA Quality Scholars Program, if consistent with career goals
  9. Participation in IDSA’s Emerging Infections Network projects
  10. Participation in UI Hospitals & Clinics Lean Improvement Model for Healthcare course, year 2
  11. Participation in UIHC Quality Leadership Academy

Physician Scientist Track

Physician Scientist Track: to prepare fellows for careers in ID-related investigative laboratory science.

Primarily for those with prior basic science experience. In addition to the basic curriculum:

  1. Membership in specialty society pertinent to area of chosen research
  2. Laboratory research project. Mentors/projects are available, both from within the ID division and from other divisions and departments (e.g. Microbiology, Immunology, Pulmonary Medicine, etc.). Areas of focus within the ID division include:
    1. Inflammation and innate immunity [see faculty at  Inflammation Program]
    2. Virology (Dr. Jack Stapleton and Dr. Jeff Meier)
    3. Parasitology (Dr. Mary Wilson), including collaborative projects with Tropical Medicine Institute in Natal, Brazil (Selma Jeronimo, MD, PhD)
    4. Vaccinology [see Vaccine Education and Research Unit]
    5. Other labs directed by Carver College of Medicine research faculty or University of Iowa departments
      - Department of Microbiology and Immunology
  3. Support for 3rd and 4th year of fellowship with primary research focus through several mechanisms
    1. Infectious Disease Training Grant (T32)
    2. Parasitism Training Grant
    3. Immunology Training Grant

Scientific meeting during 2nd or 3rd year

Rotation/Educational Experience: Year One

Clinical Training is concentrated in the first year of the program. During the first year the fellow will receive in-depth education in clinical infectious diseases. Clinical Rotations occur at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics and at the VA Medical Center (VAMC), which is located across the street from UI Hospitals & Clinics.  Rotations in Transplant ID and Antimicrobial Stewardship/Hospital Epidemiology will occur. The fellow will have weekly COC clinics (alternating tween HIV and general ID COC clinics) and may attend several Travel clinics when not on service.  The fellow will participate in ID conferences, journal club, ID Grand Rounds, core curriculum, research conference and fellows’ interdisciplinary conference.

Team 1 - 1st year

Team 2 - 1st year

Antimicrobial Stewardship and Hospital Epidemiology

Clinical Microbiology

Continuity of Care Clinic

Transplant Infectious Disease

Travel Clinic (Limited number of assigned clinics)

Virology Clinic

 

Team 1 - 1st year

  • Inpatient UIHC Consults. On average, this service handles 120-140 new consults per month. All consults are staffed with a faculty member
  • Approximately 5 months of the first year will be spent on Team 1 inpatient consult service
  • Medical Microbiology Rounds twice a week

Goals and Objectives

During this rotation, the first year fellow is expected to:

  • Develop medical knowledge base of infections commonly encountered in a variety of hosts and in variety of organ systems
  • Develop a logical approach to differential diagnosis of various syndromes, recognize common clinical manifestations of particular organisms and develop a diagnostic and treatment plan that is appropriate and feasible
  • Become proficient in obtaining a complete history and physical examination for a variety of infectious diseases
  • Provide appropriate inpatient follow up, and arrange for adequate outpatient follow up
  • Develop skills to effectively and appropriately supervise and teach rotating internal medicine residents and students
  • Provide appropriate inpatient follow up, and arrange for adequate outpatient follow up
  • Develop communication skills that will lead to effective relations with referring services
  • Perform a literature search for medical topics, and interpret such literature in the context of a clinical case
  • Develop facility in providing parenteral or oral antimicrobials during hospitalization and after patient’s discharge, and understand the financial and medical issues involved with extended antimicrobial administration
  • Acquire leadership skills in directing the consult team which includes residents, students and pharmacy personnel
  • Develop skills of antimicrobial stewardship
  • Develop knowledge of methods to reduce the risk of healthcare associated infections
  • Increase medical microbiology knowledge

Team 2 - 1st year

  • Outpatient consults at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, plus UI Hospitals & Clinics inpatient consults with 1:1 fellow:staff model or VAMC inpatient consults
  • Approximately 3 months of the first year will be Team 2 outpatient consult service

Goals and Objectives

During this rotation, the first year fellow is expected to:

  • Develop medical knowledge base of wide variety infections encountered in the clinic, as well as in hospitalized patients
  • Develop a logical approach to differential diagnosis of various syndromes, develop a diagnostic and treatment plan that is appropriate and feasible
  • Provide effective patient follow up
  • Develop skills to communicate with the referring services or outside referral entities, both verbally and in writing
  • Perform a literature searches to address questions, and apply such literature into a clinical case
  • Prescribe parenteral and oral antimicrobials in outpatient and inpatient settings, and understand the medical and issues involved with extended antimicrobial administration
  • Apply principles of antimicrobial stewardship
  • Successfully oversee transitions of care and manage OPAT patients

Antimicrobial Stewardship and Hospital Epidemiology

The goals of the year 1 and year 2 rotations are to give the fellows practical and scholarly training in Antimicrobial Stewardship and Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Control.

  • Trainees will participate in Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics and the VA Hospital, joining the physician-pharmacy teams in their patient reviews and communication with teams. Didactic instruction strengthens AMS expertise gained.

Fellows will participate in the IDSA basic and advanced AMS curricula.

  • During the Hospital Epidemiology rotation, fellows will participate in multiple activities of the Program of Infection Prevention at UIHC.  The goal is to understand the principles of surveillance and experience a programmatic approach to infection prevention, quality improvement and outbreak investigation. We anticipate this experience will ignite ideas for scholarly work/Quality Improvement.

Fellows complete one of the following: a) SHEA online infection control course (Primer on Healthcare Epidemiology, Infection Control & Antimicrobial Stewardship); or b) SHEA spring or fall meeting in infection prevention

Clinical Microbiology

Two to four weeks will be spent in the clinical microbiology laboratory with intensive instruction and hands-on experience with a clinical microbiologist.  In addition, twice-weekly medical micro tutorials occur for Team 1 members; all fellows are invited.

Goals and Objectives

By the end of this rotation, the fellow is expected to:

  • Understand and recommend various methods of appropriately collecting and transporting various specimen
  • Be competent in microscopic examination of specimen
  • Understand various staining and culturing techniques for a variety of bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and the principles and appropriateness of molecular diagnostic techniques
  • Be able to interpret susceptibility data, and limitations of testing
  • Understand mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance

Teaching Methods

Daily plate rounds with the Clinical Microbiology Lab: Complete bench rotations on checklist. Work with pathology resident on service to organize Micro tutorials with the ID consult Team 1.

Microbiology lecture block, monthly Pathology Department micro conference.

Continuity of Care Clinic

Fellows see patients in follow-up who were previously seen by the inpatient consult service, as well as evaluate new outpatient ID consults in this every other week clinic.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Be familiar with management of outpatient IV antibiotics
  • Be familiar with the natural course of infections that require treatment for multiple weeks or resolve over lengthy periods of time
  • Recognize when the course of illness indicates possible complication of therapy or a suboptimal response that warrants further evaluation or change in therapy
  • Gain experience in outpatient evaluation and management of Infectious Diseases

Transplant ID

One rotation will be spent on the ID Transplant service during year 1.  Additional elective rotations are available.

Goals and Objectives

By the end of this rotation, the fellow is expected to:

  • Develop a differential diagnosis and management plan for patients in this immunocompromised population
  • Understand the net state of immunosuppression and its impact on patient predisposition to infectious complications over time
  • Understand the principles of and indications for immuno-prophylaxis and chemo-prophylaxis in this population
  • Understand the drug interactions, toxicities, and mechanisms of action of immunosuppressive agents
  • Perform an appropriate pre-transplant infectious diseases assessment
  • Demonstrate appropriate inpatient follow up care for this patient population
  • Communicate effectively with the transplant service, both verbally and in the medical record
  • Recognize common infection entities of the vulnerable patient and how they vary with time after treatment

Mix of Clinical Topics

There are on average about 25-30 inpatient and 6 outpatient consults per month.

Travel Clinic

  • Held twice weekly at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, fellows rotate as per schedule
  • Each fellow will participate in 4 ½ day Travel clinics

Goals and Objectives

  • During this rotation, the fellow is expected to:
  • Become proficient in obtaining pertinent health history and vaccination history
  • Become proficient in predicting possible exposures based on patient’s itinerary, travel plans and underlying health status.
  • Become proficient in recommending immunoprophylaxis and chemoprophylaxis, in a manner individualized to the traveler’s medical and social needs and planned itinerary
  • Provide advice as to general principles of avoiding a variety of environmental exposures
  • Help arrange follow up if problems arise for returning travelers.
  • Develop understanding of, and comply with, various governmental requirements for travel

Teaching Methods

  • An ID attending or experienced advance practice provider is present for each patient encounter, reviews the relevant history and travel plans, and helps decide on the recommendations and counseling given to patients. Assessment, plans and encounter notes are reviewed.
  • Simulated patient tutorial available, overseen by Travel Clinic Director

Mix of Clinical Topics

There are usually 40-60 new travel clinic visits per month at UI Hospitals & Clinics. Patients traveling to countries all over the world are seen for pre-travel recommendations.

Patient Characteristics and types of clinical encounters, procedures and services:

  • Patients from a variety of socioeconomic levels and ancestral background are evaluated

Reading/Learning Lists

  • CDC Yellow Book
  • Travax Web site
  • Principles and Practice of Infectious Disease, Mandell, et. al., 7th edition
  • Core curriculum conferences on parasitology and tropical/travel medicine

Evaluation

Immediate feedback is given on each patient presentation. Written evaluations by the Travel clinic attendings are given biannually.

Virology Clinic

Over 600 patients are provided HIV care in the Virology Clinic, part of the Ryan White Program.  An integrated multidisciplinary model is used to manage the complex needs that may be encountered.  Fellows gain experience by managing a panel of patients whom they follow during their fellowship. 

Goals and Objectives:

  • Develop competence in the evaluation and management of patients with HIV infection, working within a multidisciplinary team
  • Gain competence in the prescribing of ARV for the treatment of HIV infection as well as treatment of HIV/Hepatitis C or HIV/Hepatitis B co-infections
  • Be familiar with risk factors for and manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections
  • Provide preventive care for non-infectious co-morbidities associated with HIV infection

Rotation/Educational Experience: Year Two

Year 2 of fellowship provides considerable flexibility to engage in specialty training pertinent to the track chosen by the fellow (see discussion of tracks and schedule above for pertinent training opportunities).  This includes time to perform a scholarly project, overseen by a faculty mentor and assisted by other faculty members who sit on the fellows’ research committee.  Scholarly projects may be completed in areas of hospital epidemiology/infection prevention, process improvement, clinical investigation, microbiology, vaccine evaluation or basic science.  There are 2-3 months spent on Team I or II or specialty rotations.  Additional elective rotations are available.  The fellow will continue to participate in curriculum conferences, journal club, ID Grand Rounds, research conference and fellows’ interdisciplinary conference.

Team 1 - 2nd year

Team 2 - 2nd year

Antimicrobial Stewardship and Hospital Epidemiology elective

 Clinical Microbiology

Continuity of Care Clinic

Hepatology (Limited number of assigned clinics)

Orthopedic Infectious Disease (Year 1 or 2 for Clinical/Clinician-Educator Track) 

Transplant Infectious Disease - UI Hospitals & Clinics/VAMC Solid Organ Transplantation and Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Service (Year 1 or 2)

Travel Clinic (Limited number of assigned clinics)

Virology Clinic

Hospital Epidemiology

Allergy/Immunology Rotation (optional)

Pediatric Infectious Disease Rotation (optional) 

U. of Iowa Extension Course for Infection Prevention Professionals

ID Week

Second meeting of fellow’s choice (During Year 2 or 3, depending on track)

Team 1 - 2nd year

  • Inpatient University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics Consults. On average, this service handles 120-140 new consults per month
  • 1 to 2 months of the second year will be spent on Team 1 inpatient consult service

Goals and Objectives

During this rotation, the second year fellow is expected to:

  • Develop medical knowledge base of infections commonly encountered in a variety of hosts and in variety of organ systems
  • Develop a logical approach to differential diagnosis of various syndromes, recognize common clinical manifestations of particular organisms and develop a diagnostic and treatment plan that is appropriate and feasible
  • Become proficient in obtaining a complete history and physical examination for a variety of infectious diseases
  • Provide appropriate inpatient follow up, and arrange for adequate outpatient follow up
  • Develop skills to effectively and appropriately supervise and teach rotating internal medicine residents and students
  • Provide appropriate inpatient follow up, and arrange for adequate outpatient follow up
  • Develop communication skills that will lead to effective relations with referring services
  • Perform a literature search for medical topics, and interpret such literature in the context of a clinical case
  • Develop facility in providing parenteral or oral antimicrobials during hospitalization and after patient’s discharge, and understand the financial and medical issues involved with extended antimicrobial administration
  • Acquire leadership skills in directing the consult team which includes residents, students and pharmacy personnel
  • Develop skills of antimicrobial stewardship
  • Develop knowledge of methods to reduce the risk of healthcare associated infections
  • Increase medical microbiology knowledge

Team 2 - 2nd year

  • Outpatient consults at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, limited UI Hospitals & Clinics inpatient consults and VAMC inpatient consults.
  • 1 or 2 months of the second year will be spent on Team 2 outpatient consult service.

Goals and Objectives

During this rotation, the second year fellow is expected to:

  • Increase independence
  • Develop medical knowledge base of wide variety  infections encountered in the clinic, as well as in hospitalized patients
  • Develop a logical approach to differential diagnosis of various syndromes, develop a diagnostic and treatment plan that is appropriate and feasible
  • Provide effective patient follow up
  • Develop skills to communicate with the referring services or outside referral entities, both verbally and in writing
  • Perform a literature searches to address questions, and apply such literature in to a clinical case
  • Prescribe parenteral and oral antimicrobials in outpatient and inpatient settings, and understand the medical and issues involved with extended antimicrobial administration
  • Apply principles of antimicrobial stewardship

Antimicrobial Stewardship and Hospital Epidemiology Elective

The goals of the year 1 and year 2 rotations are to give the fellows practical and scholarly training in Antimicrobial Stewardship and Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Control.

  • Trainees will participate in Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics and the VA Hospital, joining the physician-pharmacy teams in their patient reviews and communication with teams. Didactic instruction strengthens AMS expertise gained.

Fellows will participate in the IDSA basic and advanced AMS curricula.

  • During the Hospital Epidemiology rotation, fellows will participate in multiple activities of the Program of Infection Prevention at UIHC.  The goal is to understand the principles of surveillance and experience a programmatic approach to infection prevention, quality improvement and outbreak investigation. We anticipate this experience will ignite ideas for scholarly work/Quality Improvement.

Fellows complete one of the following: a) SHEA online infection control course (Primer on Healthcare Epidemiology, Infection Control & Antimicrobial Stewardship); or b) SHEA spring or fall meeting in infection prevention

Clinical Microbiology

During the second year, the Clinical Microbiology one-month rotation is not required, unless the fellow did not participate during the first year.

Goals and Objectives

By the end of this rotation, the fellow is expected to:

  • Understand and recommend various methods of appropriately collecting and transporting various specimen
  • Be competent in microscopic examination of specimen
  • Understand various staining and culturing techniques for a variety of bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and the principles and appropriateness of molecular diagnostic techniques
  • Be able to interpret susceptibility data, and limitations of testing
  • Understand mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance

Teaching Methods

Daily plate rounds with the Clinical Microbiology Lab: Complete bench rotations on checklist. Work with pathology resident on service to organize micro rounds with the ID consult Team I.

Microbiology lecture block, monthly micro conference

Continuity of Care Clinic

Fellows see patients in follow-up who were previously seen by the inpatient consult service, as well as evaluate new outpatient ID consults in this every other week clinic.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Be familiar with management of outpatient IV antibiotics
  • Be familiar with the natural course of infections that require treatment for multiple weeks or resolve over lengthy periods of time
  • Recognize when the course of illness indicates possible complication of therapy or a suboptimal response that warrants further evaluation or change in therapy
  • Gain experience in outpatient evaluation and management of Infectious Diseases

Hepatology Clinic

Each fellow will have 5 to 6 half-day clinics during the second year of training.

Goals and Objectives

By the end of this rotation, the fellow is expected to:

  • Establish an appropriate and logical work up of viral hepatitis
  • Understand risks and benefits of obtaining a liver biopsy
  • Understand the principles of and indications for anti-viral therapy in this patient population
  • Understand the drug interactions, toxicities, and mechanisms of action of anti-viral agents used for treatment of viral hepatitis
  • Demonstrate appropriate inpatient and outpatient follow up care for this patient population
  • Communicate effectively with the referring services, both verbally and in the medical record

Teaching Methods

A hepatology attending is present for each patient encounter, reviews the relevant history and treatment plans. Assessment, plans and encounter notes are reviewed.

Orthopedic Infectious Disease

Elective rotations will be available on the ID ortho service. 

Goals and Objectives

By the end of this rotation, the fellow is expected to:

  • Establish an appropriate and logical work up of suspected infections in this population
  • Understand the unique biological environment created within the musculoskeletal system by implantation of foreign device, and its impact on emergence and persistence of infection in this patient population
  • Understand the medical and surgical indications for management of orthopedic infections
  • Understand the role of infection control measures in this patient population (screening for carriage of organisms commonly associated with wound infection (staph aureus) organisms, pre-surgical antibiotic prophylaxis, etc)
  • Demonstrate appropriate inpatient and outpatient follow up care for this patient population
  • Communicate effectively with the orthopedic surgery service, both verbally and in the medical record

Mix of Clinical Topics

There are on average about 5-10 inpatient and 4-8 scheduled outpatient consults per week from the orthopedic service.  The fellow is expected to attend at least 1 outpatient ortho-ID clinic per week while undertaking this rotation.

Transplant ID

One rotation will be spent on the ID Transplant service during year 2.  Additional elective rotations are available.

Goals and Objectives

By the end of this rotation, the fellow is expected to:

  • Develop a differential diagnosis and management plan for patients in this immunocompromised population
  • Understand the net state of immunosuppression and its impact on patient predisposition to infectious complications over time
  • Understand the principles of and indications for immuno-prophylaxis and chemo-prophylaxis in this population
  • Understand the drug interactions, toxicities, and mechanisms of action of immunosuppressive agents
  • Perform an appropriate pre-transplant infectious diseases assessment
  • Demonstrate appropriate inpatient follow up care for this patient population
  • Communicate effectively with the transplant service, both verbally and in the medical record
  • Recognize common infection entities of the vulnerable patient and how they vary with time after treatment

Mix of Clinical Topics

There are on average about 25-30 inpatient and 6 outpatient consults per month.

Travel Clinic

Each fellow will have 4 to 6 half-day Travel clinics during the second year of training.

Goals and Objectives

To gain facility in counseling and providing vaccines and medications for patients traveling to international destinations.

Virology Clinic

Over 600 patients are provided HIV care in the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics Virology Clinic.  An integrated multidisciplinary model is used to manage the complex needs that may be encountered.  Fellows gain experience by managing a panel of patients whom they follow during their fellowship.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Be comfortable with the evaluation of patients newly diagnosed with HIV/AIDS
  • Be comfortable initiating an ARV regimen, taking into account unique patient circumstances, and be familiar with adverse side-effects of the medications
  • Be familiar with risk factors, manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections in HIV infected patients
  • Manage patients with HIV infection over years and provide preventive care for non-infectious complications of their infection.

Conferences

  • Infectious Disease Grand Rounds (weekly): Two cases are presented by the fellows or staff as unknowns, discussed, and pertinent literature reviewed 
  • Core Curriculum Conference (weekly): didactic lectures on general and specialty ID topics over 2 year-cycle (see Curriculum for more details on topics)
  • Journal Club (monthly)
  • Research conference (weekly): progress on ongoing research activity is presented (ID Faculty and Fellows’ Conference)
  • Departmental Interdisciplinary Fellow's Curriculum (twice-monthly): presentations on common requirements of the fellowship programs including ethics, coding and billing, statistics, sleep deprivation, practice management, etc. [view schedule]
  • ID Week and second meeting of fellows’ choice
  • University of Iowa Update in Infectious Disease Regional CME Meeting (annually)
  • Various multi-disciplinary conferences, including Pathology Department Microbiology, Morbidity/Mortality, Internal Medicine Grand Rounds and Quality Improvement, etc.
  • ID Resident Curriculum Module Facilitation (monthly): 2nd year fellows
  • Clinical Micro tutorials twice a week for Team 1

Educational Opportunities

Several Degrees could be obtained by fellows who perform a 3rd year of fellowship. These include:

  1. Master of Public Health degree that is offered through the College of Public Health [more information]
  2. Masters in Medical Education Degree (MME). The purpose of this program is develop a community of academic medical faculty with formal training in education who will create and sustain a culture of educational excellence within the College of Medicine, the university, and the medical education community at-large. [more information]
  3. Masters of Scientific Investigation is a 2-year interdisciplinary effort to prepare post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty from the Colleges of Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, and Pharmacy for careers in clinical research through the provision of a structured didactic curriculum in research methods and a mentored research experience. 
  4. Training in clinical education can also occur during the 2nd year of fellowship through the Fellows as Clinician-Educators (FACE), a program developed within the Department of Medicine.

Opportunities in Research/Scholarly Projects

Several funding opportunities are listed below for trainees who perform a third or fourth year of fellowship. There are visa limitations for several of the grants listed below.  Tuition support for graduate work has been available for fellows during their research years.

  1. Infectious Diseases Training Grant 
  2. Parasitism Training Grant
  3. Immunology Training Grant 
  4. VA Quality Scholars Program

The Division of Infectious Diseases offers a broad range of research opportunities, with faculty members conducting laboratory research in innate immunity, host-pathogen interactions, parasitology, and virology. There are also opportunities for projects in medical microbiology, antimicrobial stewardship, hospital epidemiology, healthcare delivery, Quality Improvement, infection prevention, computational epidemiology and with the Vaccine Trials Unit.

  • The Inflammation Program: An interdisciplinary basic science research program that studies innate immunity and host-pathogen interactions with work related to MRSA, Leishmania, and other pathogens. [see the Inflammation Program website]
  • Dr. Stapleton studies the interactions between flaviviruses including hepatitis C virus and GB virus C with HIV.
  • Dr. Winokur leads the University of Iowa NIAID-funded Vaccine Trials and Education Unit.
  • Dr. Herwaldt has multiple funded studies in infection prevention and the molecular epidemiology of healthcare-associated infections. She is the PI of a CDC Epi Center Grant in Infection Prevention
  • Dr. Wilson studies the pathogenesis, biology, immunology, and genetics of Leishmania. She has collaborative projects in Brazil with two adjunct Infectious Diseases faculty members (Drs. Jeronimo and Carvalho) and other scholars in India. She coordinates international clinical experiences for trainees as well.
  • Dr. Diekema is the former Director of the Infectious Diseases Division, a co-director of the UIHC Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, and interim Hospital Epidemiologist at UIHC. He studies the Epidemiology of infection.
  • Dr. Meier studies basic mechanisms of CMV pathogenesis and latency, and he is active in HIV clinical research.
  • Dr. Polgreen is currently the director of the Emerging Infections Network (EIN), an infectious disease physicians' network, sponsored by the CDC and IDSA, to detect and gather information on various emerging and re-emerging infections. He is a cofounder of the interdisciplinary Computational Epidemiology Program at the University of Iowa, which applies bioinformatics to infectious diseases.
  • Dr. Ohl is a member of the VA Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research & Evaluation Team (CADRE) group and studies healthcare quality and delivery. He has developed innovative models to provide HIV care to veterans in rural settings via telehealth. He has CDC funding to expand TelePrEP and is trained in Addiction Medicine.
  • Dr. Ince, director of the Transplant Infectious Disease program, also is the physician champion of the UIHC Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (AMS) and is active in AMS research.
  • Dr. Goto is a member of CADRE at the VA. He studies ID-related healthcare outcomes and healthcare quality using VA databases. 
  • Dr. Livorsi researches healthcare quality and delivery, with a focus on antimicrobial stewardship.  He is a member of the VA CADRE group.
  • Dr. Sekar specializes in Ortho ID consultation and undertakes Ortho ID clinical research at the VA.
  • Dr. Suzuki conducts research in healthcare delivery and antimicrobial stewardship.  He is the incoming Hospital Epidemiologist at the VA (as of July, 2021)
  • Dr. Carvour has an interest in Ortho ID and combines this with research in health equity.

Scholarly Activity during ID Fellowship

Year One

Two to three months of the first year are not assigned to clinical rotations. Part of this time is vacation. During the remaining time, the fellow is expected to meet with faculty members within or outside the division to discuss possible scholarly projects. Under the faculty member’s mentorship, we anticipate that by the end of year 1 a project has been selected.

Scholarly work can include Quality Improvement projects, Antimicrobial Stewardship projects or research initiatives, Hospital Epi research, clinical research, bench research or coordination of new clinical initiatives.

Year Two                

Three to four months of the year are dedicated to consult work.  The second year of fellowship allows for significant time to develop and execute a scholarly project. A mentor will guide the project, and a research committee or co-mentor selected from other faculty members will provide additional guidance as needed. Work will be presented during the ID Research Conference toward the end of year 2.  

Year Three

A third year of fellowship is available for those who plan a career in academics and are engaged in a fruitful research project (see Fellowship Tracks). Building on productive scholarly work during Year 2, the majority of Year 3 will be dedicated to research/scholarly work and possible course work. 


Select publication by Infectious Disease fellows:

Matthew Smith (graduating 2022)

Smith M, Kobayashi T, Sekar P. Antibody testing to distinguish between histoplasmosis and blastomycosis. BMJ Case Rep. 2021 May 31;14(5):e243587. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2021-243587.

Livorsi, DJ, Nair, R, Dysangco, A, Aylward, A, Alexander, B, Smith, MW, Kouba, S, Perencevich, EN. Using audit-and-feedback to improve antimicrobial-prescribing in Emergency Departments: a multicenter quasi-experimental study in the Veterans Health Administration. Open Forum Infectious Diseases, ofab186, April 14, 2021.

Fernando Casado Castillo (graduated 2021)

Casado-Castillo F, Kobayashi T, Sekar P, Streit J, Molano De Pena I. Prosthetic hip infection due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. IDCases. 2021 May 23;25:e01170. doi: 10.1016/j.idcr.2021.e01170.

Kobayashi T, Trannel A, Holley SA, Alsuhaibani M, Abosi OJ, Jenn KE, Meacham H, Sheeler LL, Etienne W, Dains A, Casado F, Kukla ME, Ward E, Ford B, Edmond MB, Wellington M, Diekema DJ, Salinas JL. COVID-19 Serial Testing among Hospitalized Patients in a Midwest Tertiary Medical Center, July-September 2020. Clin Infect Dis. 2020 Oct 26:ciaa1630. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa1630. Online ahead of print.PMID: 33103196

Edin Pujagic (graduated 2021)

Kobayashi, T, Bogdanic, F, Pujagic, E, Goto, M. Isolated Splenic Abscess due to Salmonella Berta in a Healthy Adult. BMJ Case Rep. 2020 Apr 7;13(4). pii: e235318. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2020-235318

Htay Phyu (graduated 2020)

Phyu, H, Edmond, MB, Kobayashi, T. Metronidazole-Induced Encephalopathy ID Cases. 2019 Sep 7; 18:e00639 doi: 10.1016/j.idcr.2019.e00639. eCollection 2019. PMID 31692663

Phyu, H, Kobayashi, T., Rastogi, P, Cho, C. Vancomycin-induced linear Immunogloblulin A bullous dermatosis. BMJ Case Reports, Dec 2019, 12(12) e233281: DOI: 10.1136/bcr-2019-233281 PMID 31822537

Phyu H, Kobayashi T, Ford, B, Molano, I. Splenic abscess as a rare presentation of blastomycosis. BMJ Case Rep. 2020 Feb 13; 13(2). Pii: e234062. Doi: 10.1136/bcr-2019-234062 PMID 32060116

Takaaki Kobayashi (graduated 2020)

Kobayashi T, Trannel A, Holley SA, Alsuhaibani M, Abosi OJ, Jenn KE, Meacham H, Sheeler LL, Etienne W, Dains A, Casado F, Kukla ME, Ward E, Ford B, Edmond MB, Wellington M, Diekema DJ, Salinas JL. COVID-19 Serial Testing among Hospitalized Patients in a Midwest Tertiary Medical Center, July-September 2020. Clin Infect Dis. 2020 Oct 26:ciaa1630. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa1630. Online ahead of print.PMID: 33103196

Kobayashi T, Amram AL, Gehrs K, Diekema D, Barker J. A 52-Year-Old Man With Uveitis and Altered Mental Status. Clin Infect Dis. 2021 Mar 1;72(5):873-875. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa051.PMID: 33667312

Kobayashi T, Salinas JL, Ten Eyck P, Chen B, Ando T, Inagaki K, Alsuhaibani M, Auwaerter PG, Molano I, Diekema DJ. Palliative care consultation in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Palliat Med. 2021 Apr;35(4):785-792. doi: 10.1177/0269216321999574. Epub 2021 Mar 24.PMID: 33757367

Kobayashi T, Marra AR, Schweizer ML, Ten Eyck P, Wu C, Alzunitan M, Salinas JL, Siegel M, Farmakiotis D, Auwaerter PG, Healy HS, Diekema DJ. Impact of Infectious Disease Consultation in Patients With Candidemia: A Retrospective Study, Systematic Literature Review, and Meta-analysis. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2020 Aug 3;7(9):ofaa270. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofaa270. eCollection 2020 Sep.PMID: 32904995

Kobayashi T, Beck B, Miller A, Polgreen P, O'Shea AMJ, Ohl ME. Positive Predictive Values of 2 Algorithms for Identifying Patients with Intravenous Drug Use-Associated Endocarditis Using Administrative Data. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2020 Jun 1;7(6):ofaa201. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofaa201. eCollection 2020 Jun.PMID: 32607386

Kobayashi T, Jenn KE, Bowdler N, Malloy R, Holley S, Izakovic T, Kukla ME, Abosi O, Dains A, Meacham H, Diekema DJ, Edmond MB, Salinas JL. Reduction in abdominal hysterectomy surgical site infection rates after the addition of anaerobic antimicrobial prophylaxis. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2020 Dec;41(12):1469-1471. doi: 10.1017/ice.2020.386. Epub 2020 Aug 28.PMID: 32856576

Kobayashi T, Meacham H, Alsuhaibani M, Holley S, Marra AR, Edmond MB, Diekema DJ, Hartley PG, Salinas JL. Occupational tuberculosis exposures and conversion rates can guide deimplementation of annual tuberculosis skin test screening. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021 Jan;42(1):123-124. doi: 10.1017/ice.2020.205. Epub 2020 Jun 2.PMID: 32484119

Kobayashi T, Clore GS, Kukla ME, Alzunitan M, Kritzman J, Abosi O, Puig-Asensio M, Marra AR, Diekema DJ, Edmond MB, Salinas JL. Insertion site inflammation was associated with central-line-associated bloodstream infections at a tertiary-care center, 2015-2018. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021 Mar;42(3):348-350. doi: 10.1017/ice.2020.445. Epub 2020 Oct 9.PMID: 33032671

Kobayashi T, Ford B, Fujita N, Appenheimer AB. Ocular Actinomycosis Mimicking Meningioma. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2020 May 19;7(6):ofaa170. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofaa170. eCollection 2020 Jun.PMID: 32529000

Kobayashi T, Lawler E, Samra H, Ford B, Sekar P. Prosthetic Finger Joint Infection Due to Aspergillus terreus. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2020 Dec 13;8(1):ofaa614. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofaa614. eCollection 2021 Jan.PMID: 33511236

Kobayashi T, Ando T, Streit J, Sekar P. Current Evidence on Oral Antibiotics for Infective Endocarditis: A Narrative Review. Cardiol Ther. 2019 Dec;8(2):167-177. doi: 10.1007/s40119-019-00148-4. Epub 2019 Sep 18.PMID: 31535282

Sammantha Kouba (graduated 2020)

Kouba SJ, Kobayashi T, Blount RJ, Herwaldt L. Atrial flutter as a rare manifestation of leptospirosis. BMJ Case Rep. 2020 Aug 26:13(8)e237693 PMID 32847893

Kouba S, Kobayashi T, Meier J, Sekar, P. Osseous blastomycosis mimicking malignancy. BMJ Case Rep. 2020 Aug 25;13(8):e237688 PMID 32843470

Livorsi, DJ, Nair, R, Dysangco, A, Aylward, A, Alexander, B, Smith, MW, Kouba, S, Perencevich, EN. Using audit-and-feedback to improve antimicrobial-prescribing in Emergency Departments: a multicenter quasi-experimental study in the Veterans Health Administration. Open Forum

Hiroyuki Suzuki (graduated 2019)

Suzuki H, Perencevich EN, Livorsi DJ, Alexander B, Beck BF, Richardson KK, Goto M. Attributable mortality due to fluoroquinolone and extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance in hospital-onset Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp bacteremia: A matched cohort study in 129 Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2019 Aug;40(8):928-931.

Suzuki H, Perencevich EN, Alexander B, Beck BF, Goto M, Lund BC, Nair R, and Livorsi DJ. Inpatient Fluoroquinolone Stewardship Improves the Quantity and Quality of Fluoroquinolone-prescribing at Hospital Discharge: A Retrospective Analysis among 122 Veterans Health Administration Hospitals. Clin Infect Dis. 2020 Aug 22;71(5):1232-1239.

Suzuki H, Perencevich EN, Nair R, Livorsi DJ, Goto M. Excess Length of Acute Inpatient Stay Attributable to Acquisition of Hospital-Onset Gram-Negative Bloodstream Infection with and without Antibiotic Resistance: A Multistate Model Analysis. Antibiotics 2020, 9(2), 96

Suzuki H, Clore G, Perencevich EN, Hockett-Sherlock S, Goto M, Nair R, Branch-Elliman W, Richardson K, Gupta K, Beck BF, Alexander B, Balkenende E, Schweizer ML. Development of a Fully Automated Surgical Site Infection Detection Algorithm for Use in Cardiac and Orthopedic Surgery Research. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021 Feb 23;1-6.

Suzuki H, Perencevich EN, Goto M, Nair R, Puig-Asensio M, Ernst E, Livorsi DJ. A Comprehensive Assessment of Carbapenem Use across 90 Veterans Health Administration Hospitals with Defined Stewardship Strategies for Carbapenems. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2021 Feb 1;dkab008.

Christine Cho (graduated 2017)

Cho C, Teghanemt A, Apicella MA, Nauseef WM. Modulation of phagocytosis-induced cell death of human neutrophils by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. J Leukoc Biol. 2020 September 25. doi: 10.1002/JLB.4MA0820-649R.

Kobayashi T, Swick BL, Cho C. Clinical image: chronic skin ulcers in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on immunosuppressant therapy. Clin Rheumatol. 2020 Jun 26. doi:10.1007/s10067-020-05251-9.

Phyu H, Kobayashi T, Cho C, Rastogi P. Vancomycin-Induced Linear Immunoglobulin A Bullous Dermatosis. BMJ Case Reports. 2019;12:e233281.

Kobayashi T, Cho C. Mediastinal granuloma due to histoplasmosis in a patient on infliximab. Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. 2019;86(9):579-581.

Benjamin Avner (graduated 2017)

Amjadi MF, Avner BS, Greenlee-Wacker MC, Horswill AR, Nauseef WM (2021). Neutrophil-derived extracellular vesicles modulate the phenotype of naïve human neutrophils. J Leukoc Biol (published online ahead of print) PMID 33682200

Alpheus (Benjamin) Appenheimer (graduated 2016)

Appenheimer AB, Bokhour B, McInnes DK, Richardson KK, Thurman AL, Beck BF, Vaughan-Sarrazin M, Asch SM, Midboe AM, Taylor T, Dvorin K, Gifford AL, Ohl ME. Should HIV Specialty Clinics Treat Patients with Hypertension or Refer to Primary Care? An Analysis of Treatment Outcomes. Open Forum Infectious Diseases. 2017 Feb 3;4(1):ofx005.

Julian KG, Crook T, Curley E, Appenheimer AB, Paules CI, Hasse B, Diekema DJ, Daley CL, de Sanctis J, Hellinger WC, Levin A, McSherry G, Freer C, Whitener CJ. Long-term follow-up of post-cardiac surgery Mycobacterium chimaera infections: A 5-center case series. J Infect. 2020 Feb;80(2):197-203

Kobayashi T, Ford, B, Fujita, N, Appenheimer, AB. Ocular actinomycosis mimicking meningioma, Open Forum Infectious Diseases. 2020 June; 7 (6): ofaa170

Thulasi P, Saeed HN, Rapuano CJ, Hou JH, Appenheimer AB, Chodosh J, Kang JJ, Morrill AM, Vyas N, Zegans ME, Zuckerman R, Tu EY. Oral Miltefosine as Salvage Therapy for Refractory Acanthamoeba Keratitis. Am J Ophthalmol. 2020 Oct 10;223:75-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2020.09.048. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33045218

Kunatum Prasidthrathsint (graduated 2015)

Shah NS, Greenberg JA, McNulty MC, Gregg KS, Riddell IV J, Mangino JE, Weber DM, Hebert CL, Marzec NS, Barron MA, Chaparro-Rojas F, Restrepo A, Hemmige V, Prasidthrathsint K, Cobb S, Herwaldt, L, Raabe, V, Cannavino, CR, Green Hines A, Bares SH, Antiporta PB, Scardina T, Patel U, Reid G, Mohazabnia P, Kachhdiya S, Le B-M, Park CJ, Ostrowsky B, Robicsek A, Smith BA, Schied J, Bhatti MM, Mayer S, Sikka M, Murphy-Aguilu I, Patwari P, Abeles SR, Torriani FJ, Abbas Z, Toya S, Doktor K, Chakrabarti A, Doblecki-Lewis S, Looney DJ, David MZ. Severe Influenza in 33 US Hospitals, 2013–2014: Complications and Risk Factors for Death in 507 Patients. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, July 2015;00(0):1-10

Shah NS, Greenberg JA, McNulty MC, Gregg KS, Riddell J, Mangino JE, Weber DM, Hebert CL, Marzec NS, Barron MA, Chaparro-Rojas F, Restrepo A, Hemmige V, Prasidthrathsint K, Cobb S, Herwaldt L, Raabe V, Cannavino CR, Hines AG, Bares SH, Antiporta PB, Scardina T, Patel U, Reid G, Mohazabnia P, Kachhdiya S, Le BM, Park CJ, Ostrowsky B, Robicsek A, Smith BA, Schied J, Bhatti MM, Mayer S, Sikka M, Murphy-Aguilu I, Patwari P, Abeles SR, Torriani FJ, Abbas Z, Toya S, Doktor K, Chakrabarti A, Doblecki-Lewis S, Looney DJ, David MZ. Severe Influenza in 33 US Hospitals, 2013-2014: Complications and Risk Factors for Death in 507 Patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2015 Nov; 36(11):1251-60

Shah NS, Greenberg JA, McNulty MC, Gregg KS, Riddell J 4th, Mangino JE, Weber DM, Hebert CL, Marzec NS, Barron MA, Chaparro-Rojas F, Restrepo A, Hemmige V, Prasidthrathsint K, Cobb S, Herwaldt L, Raabe V, Cannavino CR, Hines AG, Bares SH, Antiporta PB, Scardina T, Patel U, Reid G, Mohazabnia P, Kachhdiya S, Le BM, Park CJ, Ostrowsky B, Robicsek A, Smith BA, Schied J, Bhatti MM, Mayer S, Sikka M, Murphy-Aguilu I, Patwari P, Abeles SR, Torriani FJ, Abbas Z, Toya S, Doktor K, Chakrabarti A, Doblecki-Lewis S, Looney DJ, David MZ. Bacterial and viral co-infections complicating severe influenza: incidence and impact among 507 U.S. Patients 2013-2014. J Clin Virol. 2016 Jul;80:12-9

Prasidthrathsint K, Voigt M, Streit JS. Association of Q Fever with Autoimmune Hepatitis. J of Autoimmune Disorders, 1:1, 2015

Prasidthrathsint, K., Lewis, J. & Couturier, M. R. (2017). The Brief Case: Angiostrongylus cantonensis Eosinophilic Meningitis in a Returned Traveler. (Vols. 55). (10), pp. 2880-2883. Journal of clinical microbiology. PMID: 28947508. 2017

Prasidthrathsint, K., Fisher, M. A. (2017). Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns among a Large, Nationwide Cohort of Abiotrophia and Granulicatella Clinical Isolates. Journal of clinical microbiology, 55(4), 1025-1031. PMID: 28077699. 2017

Prasidthrathsint K, Stapleton JT. Laboratory Diagnosis and Monitoring of Viral Hepatitis. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2019 Jun;48(2):259-279. PMID 31046974

Michihiko Goto (graduated 2014)

All citations can be reviewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/michihiko.goto.1/bibliography/public/

Goto M, Harris AD, Perencevich EN. Contact Precautions and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus-Modeling Our Way to Safety. JAMA Netw Open. 2021 Mar 1;4(3):e211574. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.1574. PubMed PMID: 33720366.

Goto M, Ueckert N, Meiches RK, Perencevich EN. Successful multimodal measures preventing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreaks without universal frequent testing within long-term care units in the Midwestern Veterans' Health Care Network. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021 Jan 11;:1-3. doi: 10.1017/ice.2020.1419. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 33427153; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC7853753.

Feller J, Lund BC, Perencevich EN, Alexander B, Heintz B, Beck B, Nair R, Goto M, Livorsi DJ. Post-discharge oral antimicrobial use among hospitalized patients across an integrated national healthcare network. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2020 Mar;26(3):327-332. doi: 10.1016/j.cmi.2019.09.016. Epub 2019 Oct 7. PubMed PMID: 31600582.

Suzuki H, Perencevich EN, Nair R, Livorsi DJ, Goto M. Excess Length of Acute Inpatient Stay Attributable to Acquisition of Hospital-Onset Gram-Negative Bloodstream Infection with and without Antibiotic Resistance: A Multistate Model Analysis. Antibiotics (Basel). 2020 Feb 23;9(2). doi: 10.3390/antibiotics9020096. PubMed PMID: 32102195; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC7168210.

Goto M, Jones MP, Schweizer ML, Livorsi DJ, Perencevich EN, Richardson K, Beck BF, Alexander B, Ohl ME. Association of Infectious Diseases Consultation With Long-term Postdischarge Outcomes Among Patients With Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia. JAMA Netw Open. 2020 Feb 5;3(2):e1921048. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.21048. PubMed PMID: 32049296.

Eiyu Matsumoto (graduated 2013)

Suzuki, H, Carlson JR, Matsumoto E. Treatment of Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis with penicillin G plus ceftriaxone. Infect Dis (Lond). 2020 Feb: 52(2): 135-138, PMID 31566044

Matsumoto, S., Matsumoto, E. A Case Report “A 20-Month-Old Girl With Fever, Seizures, Hemiparesis, and Brain Lesions Requiring a Diagnostic Brain Biopsy.” Seminars in Pediatric Neurology (available online, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.spen.2017.03.012)

Matsumoto, E., Carlson, J., Mini-Review for Clinicians, UTI Case Study 1”. Consultant. 2017;57(8):464-467. (last accessed on 12/12/2017.)

Matsumoto, E., Carlson, J., Xu, A., Mini-Review for Clinicians, UTI Case Study 2. Consultant. 2017;57(9):526-529. (last accessed on 12/12/2017)

Matsumoto, E., Carlson, J., Xu, A., Mini-Review, Recurrent C. difficile Infection, Case-Based-Approach. Consultant. 2017;57(10):583-587. (Last accessed on 12/12/2017.)

Matsumoto, E., Miller, S., Dika, M., Ferguson, N., Holte, A., Carlson, J., Photo Quiz 360, A thumb lesion in a farmer; Orf (Ecthyma Contagiosum). Consultant. 2017;57(10):609. (Last accessed on 12/12/2017.)

Matsumoto, E., Carlson, J., How Would You Triage This Patient’s Low Back Pain? (last accessed in 3/2019)

Streit JA, Matsumoto E. African Trypanosomiasis. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2380. PMID: 27974038.

Major Areas of Research

Hospital Epidemiology/Epidemiology of Infections/Antimicrobial Stewardship

  • Prevention of healthcare associated infections (Drs. Loreen Herwaldt and Marin Schweizer)
  • Antimicrobial stewardship (Drs. Livorsi and Ince)
  • Healthcare Quality and Delivery, including telehealth (Drs. Goto, Ohl, Livorsi, Suzuki and other CADRE staff)
  • Computational Epidemiology Program (Dr. Polgreen)

Host defenses/Inflammation (Faculty members of the Inflammation Program)

  • Host-pathogen interaction
  • Innate and cell-mediated immunity
  • Phagocyte biology, including:
    • Signal transduction, molecular recognition, phagocytosis
    • Iron and calcium metabolism
    • Antimicrobial peptides
    • NADPH oxidase/Myeloperoxidase

Global Health and Parasitology Research

  • Basic biology genetics and immune response of Leishmania
  • Epidemiology of M. leprae infection

Clinical Research/Translational Research

  • Antimicrobial Stewardship
  • Vaccine Trials
  • HIV Clinical Trials
  • Ortho ID
  • Equity in delivery of ID care

Medical Microbiology

  • Projects available in medical micro (Drs. Ford and Diekema)

Emerging Infections Network

  • National ID provider survey projects available with Drs. Polgreen and Herwaldt

Clinical Reviews

  • Multiple clinical faculty members

Interdisciplinary Fellowship Conference

Below is an example of the Dapartment of Internal Medicine Common Curriculum Schedule. It is shared between Fellows from all divisions of the Department.

PDF icon20-21 Fellows Conference Master Schedule.pdf

Fellows as Clinician Educators (FACE)

The Fellows as Clinician Educators (FACE) Program is designed to introduce future clinician-educators to a set of skills which may be of use in their career. The program presents concepts of educational design and research, lecture development, evaluation, observation and feedback. At the conclusion of the program, FACE participants are required to develop a teaching portfolio.

Learn more about FACE 

Why Infectious Disease at Iowa?

University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics offers the best traditions in academic excellence, patient care and collaborative research, with the added benefits of Iowa City's affordable living, healthy lifestyles and appreciation for the arts.  Highlights of training in Infectious Disease at Iowa include:

  • Outstanding clinical training in a dynamic academic medical center
  • State-of-the-art Microbiology Lab with medical microbiology training throughout the fellowship
  • Choose one of 3 tracks to achieve professional goals
  • Training grants in both Infectious Diseases and Parasitism
  • Iowa City VA is a Quality Scholars Program Site
  • Opportunities for masters degree in Public Health, Scientific Investigation, Medical Education
  • No visa restrictions
  • Many opportunities for mentored scholarly work
  • Multiple elective opportunities
  • Enjoy elective opportunities
  • Enjoy cultural amenities, diversity, and sports program of a Big Ten University city

UI Hospitals & Clinics and the Carver College of Medicine:

  • America’s Best Large Employers; #1 in healthcare, #7 overall, Forbes
  • Best Graduate Schools, U.S. News and World Report
  • America’s Best Hospitals List, U.S. News and World Report
  • America’s Best Children’s Hospitals List, U.S. News and World Report
  • 2014 Magnet Prize for Nursing

Iowa City, a top place to live: 

  • #1 Least Stressed City in America 2015
  • World City of Literature, UNESCO; Home of the internationally renowned Iowa Writer’s Workshop
  • #3 Best Places to Live List, Outside Magazine
  • Best Places to Live and Launch Fortune
  • #5 Great Places to Live, Work, MSN
  • Great outdoor opportunities
  • RAGBRAI: A week-long bike ride across Iowa, the largest bike ride in the world

How to Apply

Thank you for your interest in infectious diseases, an incredibly rich, diverse, and rewarding specialty. As is evidenced by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the bounds of our specialty know no limits, spanning pathogenesis, clinical care, disaster planning, infection control and prevention, immunology and vaccine development, public health, social determinants of health, diagnostic testing, and communication skills. While the task is daunting, we will overcome this pandemic, in large part thanks to the tireless efforts of infectious diseases experts and advocates everywhere.

IDSA, the ID Training Program Directors’ Committee, and all ID program directors understand that the fellowship application season falls during this complex and chaotic time. We also understand that some anticipated ID clinical elective rotations may not be undertaken, that anticipated research projects may not be completed, and that previously envisioned letters of recommendation may not materialize. We assure you that we will review all applications mindful of these realities, and we will not hold schedule changes imposed by COVID-19 against any applicant.

We strongly encourage anyone who is considering applying for ID fellowship training to apply, and not to withhold your application because of these concerns. We welcome your interest in infectious diseases and our program, and we look forward to meeting many of you on the interview trail this year, whether in person or remotely

 

Applications are only accepted through the Electronic Residency Application System (ERAS).

US residents should contact their Dean's Office or ERAS at https://students-residents.aamc.org/training-residency-fellowship/applying-fellowships-eras/.

International residents should contact the ECFMG at http://www.ecfmg.org/eras/index.html. Sponsorship of J-1 visas is preferred (on occasion H-1b).

An ECFMG certificate must accompany the ERAS application.

A background of research experience is not essential. However, we would encourage applicants who have a strong interest in pursuing an academic Infectious Diseases career. Our research programs range from Clinical Infectious Diseases (antibiotic stewardship, transplantation), Epidemiology (infection control, emerging infections network), Translational Research (vaccines, clinical trials, antibiotic/antifungal resistance), and Basic Research (virology, parasitology, bacteriology, and innate and adaptive immunity).

A complete ERAS application includes:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Statement of the applicant's long-term career goal and field of interest
  • Dean's letter
  • Three letters of support
  • Copies of ECFMG scores for Steps I, II, and III (if completed)
  • Notarized copies of applicant's transcripts for USMLE Steps 1, 2, and 3
  • Medical school transcript
  • An unmounted recent photograph of applicant must accompany application or be provided at time of interview.

All applicants must also register with the National Resident Matching Program (Phone: 202-828-0566).
The NRMP numbers for our program is 1203146F0.

The deadline for applications is September 30.
Selected candidates will be invited to interview.

Application Deadline

The deadline for applications is September 30.

Board Certification

Medical specialty certification in the United States is a voluntary process which serves multiple purposes for the trainee and the public.

Certification is

  • one mission of the training program to produce trainees who meet board eligibility criteria;
  • distinguishes a physician as someone with a distinct level of expertise;
  • provides more opportunities when applying for employment;
  • presents resources and tools by the ABMS; 
  • a commitment to life-long improvement for providing the best patient care; and
  • elevates physicians into the ranks of doctors committed to the highest standards of healthcare.

For more information visit the American Board of Internal Medicine for specifics on board certification requirements.

Eligibility Criteria

Qualifications for candidates include (1) an MD degree (or equivalent), (2) completion or expected completion of three years of residency training in Internal Medicine, with Board Eligibility or Certification by the American Board of Internal Medicine, by the initiation of Infectious Diseases Fellowship training

Interview Information

At the interview, perspective candidates will receive an overview of the program and tour of the facilities. They will also meet individually with key faculty members that may include any or all of the following: the program director, other Infectious Diseases faculty, and the department chair.

Our People

Program Leadership

 

Judy A. Streit, MD
Director, Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program
Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine

Phone: 319-356-7226
Email: judy-streit@uiowa.edu

 

Ilonka Molano, MD
Assistant Director, Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program
Clinical Associate Professor of Internal Medicine

Phone: 319-384-6186
email: ilonka-molano@uiowa.edu

Current Faculty

The Department of Internal Medicine has a faculty of nearly 300 professionals whose clinical, teaching, and research expertise spans the entire discipline of medicine.

Infectious Diseases Division Faculty  

Department Faculty (alphabetical listing)

Other Faculty with Infectious Diseases interest

Perencevich, Eli N., MD, MS (General Internal Medicine)
Schweizer, Marin L., PhD (General Internal Medicine)

Current Fellows

 

Taka Kobayashi, MD (F4 - Clin Epi/VAQS)
Medical School: Juntendo University School of Medicine
Residency: Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, Beth Israel


Mike Olthoff

 

Mike Olthoff, MD (F1)
Medical School: University of Iowa
Residency: University of Iowa


Andrew Simms

 

Andrew Simms, MD (F1)
Medical School: University of Nebraska
Residency: University of Iowa


Matthew Smith

 

Matt Smith, MD (F2)
Medical School: University of Nebraska
Residency: University of Iowa


Joseph Tholany

 

Joseph Tholany, MD (F2)
Medical School: St. George's University School of Medicine
Residency: University of Pittsburgh

Research Groups

Host Defense Group

Lee-Ann Allen, PhD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Botond Bánfi, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology 
Jason Barker, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) 
John T. Harty, PhD*
Professor of Microbiology
Jerrold P. Weiss, PhD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Paul McCray, MD
Professor of Pediatrics
Craig Morita, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology)
William M. Nauseef, MD*
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD*
Professor of Microbology
Julia Klesney-Tait, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary)
Mary E. Wilson, MD
Professor of Medicine and Microbiology
Elizabeth Newell, MD
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
Polly Ferguson, MD
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Thorsten Maretzky, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Prajwal Gurung, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

Molecular Pathogenesis Group

Viral Pathogenesis Subgroup

Charles Grose, MD
Professor of Pediatrics
Aloysius J. Klingelhutz, PhD
Professor of Microbiology
Jeffery Meier, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD
Professor of Microbiology
David Price, PhD
Professor, Department of Biochemistry
Richard J. Roller, PhD
Associate Professor of Microbiology
Warren Schmidt, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology-Hepatol.)
Jack Stapleton, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Wendy Maury, PhD
Associate Professor of Microbiology
C. Martin Stoltzfus, PhD
Professor of Medicine (Microbiology)
Joseph Zabner, MD
Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary)
Zuhair Ballas, MD
Professor of Medicine (Allergy)
Gail Bishop, PhD
Professor of Medicine and Microbiology
Chioma Okeoma, PhD
Assistant Professor of Microbiology
Hillel Haim, PhD
Assistant Professor of Microbiology

Bacterial Pathogenesis Subgroup

John T. Harty, PhD
Professor of Medicine (Microbiology)
Patricia L. Winokur, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Lee-Ann Allen, PhD*
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Paul McCray, MD*
Professor of Pediatrics
Craig Morita, MD, PhD*
Associate Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology)
Jerrold P. Weiss, PhD*
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
William M. Nauseef, MD*
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Patrick Schlievert, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Microbiology
 Alex Horswill, PhD
Associate Professor of Microbiology

Associate Members

  
Steven Clegg, PhD
Professor of Medicine (Microbiology)
Daniel J. Diekema, MD, MS
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Timothy L. Yahr, PhD
Associate Professor of Microbiology
Bradley Jones, PhD
Associate Professor of Microbiology
  

Eukaryotic Pathogenesis Subgroup

Louis V. Kirchhoff, MD, MPH
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
John T. Harty, PhD
Professor of Microbiology 
Mary E. Wilson, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
W. Scott Moye-Rowley, PhD
Professor of Physiology & Biophysics
  

Hospital epidemiology/Healthcare Research

Loreen Herwaldt, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease) 
Daniel Diekema, MD, MPH
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease)
Michael Edmond, MD, MPH, MPA
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)
Eli Perencevich, MD, MS
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
Michael Ohl, MD, MPH
Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease)
Marin Schweizer, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine and
Epidemiology
Philip Polgreen, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease)
  

Clinical and Vaccine Research (ID Division)

Patricia Winokur, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disesse)
Jack Stapleton, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease) 
Jeffery Meier, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease)

Clinical Microbiology Research

Daniel Diekema, MD
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease)
Bradley Ford, MD, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology
J. Stacey Klutts, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pathology 
 

Chair, Department of Internal Medicine

E. Dale Abel, MD, PhD
Chair & Department Executive Officer
Department of Internal Medicine
Francois M. Abboud Chair in Internal Medicine
John B. Stokes III Chair in Diabetes Research 
Professor of Medicine, Biochemistry, and Biomedical Engineering