Mina Chung, MD Inherited Retinal Diseases Fellowship

About the Program

Mission Statement

‘Our goal is to produce physician leaders. We are proud that graduates of our program become the ‘go to’ retina doctors in their communities, respected educators, and high impact researchers. As a major tertiary care center, we have trained over 119 retina fellows since 1962 and strive to provide the best possible educational environment through daily retina didactics; diverse exposure to common, rare and complex medical and surgical pathology; training of fundamental and advanced surgical techniques; utilization of state-of-the art innovations; ample research opportunities in the most exciting areas of medicine; and close mentorship with experienced, renown faculty who care deeply about your success.’

Dr. Stone and Mina ChungOverview of the Mina Chung, MD Inherited Retinal Diseases Fellowship

This 1-2 year long fellowship is designed for ophthalmology residency (ideally vitreoretinal fellowship)-trained physicians to gain specialized expertise in 1) clinical diagnosis and treatment of inherited retinal diseases, 2) laboratory skills related to the molecular genetic diagnosis and pathophysiology of inherited retinal diseases, and 3) research skills necessary for a successful academic career.

Start date for this fellowship is negotiable but preferably occurs July 1. Inquiries for this fellowship should be submitted directly to kim-tolsdorf@uiowa.edu (coordinator) or culver-boldt@uiowa.edu (director). If not trained in the US, all applicants must possess an H1B or O1 visa and be able to obtain permanent licensure through the Iowa Board of Medicine.

This fellowship carries a stipend of $80K per year plus fringe benefits but could be altered in cases where alternative funding source (e.g. local government) is already in place.

Other retina fellowships

Medical retina fellowship

One-year medical retina fellows spend time in the Retina Clinics where they evaluate and treat all medical retinal diseases, performing most laser photocoagulation treatments and intravitreal injections. There is no call taken by medical retina fellows. Medical retina fellows are actively engaged in clinical or laboratory research as well as conference preparation and teaching.

Vitreoretinal Surgery Fellowship

First Year of Surgical Retina Fellowship
During the first year the fellows spend a majority of their time in the Retina Clinics where they evaluate and treat medical retinal diseases, performing most laser photocoagulation treatments and intravitreal injections. The first year retina fellows do not take call for the first six months of fellowship, which allows time for reading and initiating research projects. The last six months of the 1st year, the fellows operate (typically for scleral buckle, vitrectomy, and plaque procedures) while taking retina call every other week. Any available remaining time is devoted to clinical or laboratory research as well as conference preparation and teaching.

Second Year of Surgical Retina Fellowship
The second year has a surgical emphasis with time split between the operating room and Vitreoretinal Clinics. As a major tertiary referral institution for Iowa and the surrounding 7 states, the fellow acquires extensive diagnostic and surgical experience in the management of simple and complex vitreoretinal disorders. The second year retina fellows do not take call for the last six months of fellowship. Vitreoretinal surgery is performed in both the main OR and ASC of the University of Iowa Hospital as well as the new Stead Family Children's Hospital that is connected directly to the University of Iowa Hospital.

Clinical Training

The two primary components of this fellowship include evaluating clinic adult patients with inherited retinal diseases and participation in laboratory research. The curriculum, rotation and rotation sites will consist of:

  • 2 days a week in the inherited retinal disease clinics at UIHC of Ian Han, MD, Stephen Russell, MD, Elliott Sohn, MD, and Edwin Stone, MD, PhD
  • 2 days a week in research that may involve any or all of the following according to the fellow’s specific interests and career goals:
    • Laboratory work in the Institute for Vision Research consisting of molecular genetics experimental research and writing the associated papers and grants
    • clinical trials for gene and stem-cell based therapies
    • pre-clinical rat and pig surgeries associated with gene therapy and stem cell transplantation
    • Retinal imaging
    • Phase I-III clinical trials of human retinal gene therapy
  • 1 day per week in a relatively independently managed fellow clinic seeing patients needing just-in-time procedures including intravitreal injections
  • Further clinical opportunities that may be available (with discretion of the fellowship director) include:
    • Maximum of 12 days for independent clinics that will be in place of fellow or faculty retina physicians.
    • Maximum of 12 days of retinal surgery that will be supervised by a faculty physician. If this option is exercised, we will mitigate impact on the 2 year vitreoretinal surgery fellowship by having the research fellow take a proportional number of days of vitreoretinal surgery fellow call. Otherwise, there is no call associated with the Chung fellowship.

Inherited Retinal Diseases

The surgical and medical retina fellows learn the diagnostic work-up and phenotypes of patients with inherited retinal diseases in clinics of Drs. Ian Han, Elliott Sohn, Stephen Russell and Edwin Stone. As the genetic diagnosis and treatment of these rare diseases are primary missions of the University of Iowa Institute for Vision Research, fellows gain extensive knowledge and experience in the latest treatments for these disorders, including the opportunity to assist in the surgical delivery of human gene and stem cell therapy. Research projects in inherited retinal diseases are required. By the end of this fellowship, graduates of this program will:

  • Become proficient in the work-up and diagnosis of patients with inherited retinal diseases including clinically-focused genetic testing
  • Understand how psychophysical (e.g. microperimetry and Goldmann perimetry), electrodiagnostic, and multi-modal image testing can aid in assessment and progression of these disorders
  • Become proficient in discussing genetic testing results and prognosis with patients and the implications for families
  • Be facile with core knowledge on inherited retinal disorders in stonerounds.org, Ryan Retina and other texts, and current literature
  • Develop a more precise understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations for inherited retinal diseases
  • Learn how clinical diagnostic tests are performed and interpreted utilizing results and interaction with the Carver Nonprofit Genetic Testing Laboratory

Imaging

The technique and interpretation of high-resolution optical coherence tomography, OCT-angiography, autofluorescence, and stereoscopic and wide-field fluorescein angiography for the diagnosis of diseases of the posterior pole of the eye is acquired in coordination with the Photography Service of the Department of Ophthalmology. First-year vitreoretinal and medical retina fellows direct an imaging conference once per week during the academic year. This conference is attended by staff members of the Retina Service as well as by fellows and residents in the Department of Ophthalmology.

Imaging is performed with state of the art devices for OCT, FA/ICG, autofluorescence, ultrawide field photography and OCTA, including:

  • Heidelberg Spectralis SD-OCT machines 
  • TopCon photography and SD-OCT machines
  • Zeiss SD-OCT units with OCT-angiography 
  • Zeiss Plex Elite 9000 for ultra-wide swept source OCT and OCT angiography
  • ultrawide field photography, FA, and autofluorescence with Optos, Clarus 500 and Clarus 700 units
  • Portable OCT using the Bioptigen handheld SD-OCT unit

Macular Disease

The Vitreoretinal Service evaluates over 2000 new patients a year with macular disease, the majority being patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but a wide variety of other macular diseases are also seen. Fellows play an integral part in the evaluation and treatment of all patients. Fellows gain an understanding of the role of genetic research in AMD and macular dystrophies with application to clinic patients through the Carver Lab. In addition, there are numerous studies being carried out including phase I, II, and III trials in AMD with which fellows have the opportunity to be involved with.

Retina Research

The Vitreoretinal Service is actively involved in clinical and laboratory investigations. The Mina Chung, MD Inherited Retinal Diseases fellow is expected to complete research projects based on clinical and/or laboratory experience. All Iowa fellows have access to the Experimental Surgery Unit as well as all laboratories within the department if arrangements are made with the appropriate supervisors of those laboratories.

Research building exterior

Research is usually performed within the department and the Institute for Vision Research. Presentations of research are made annually during the Resident/Fellow Research Conference at the end of the academic year. The P.J. Leinfelder Award is given annually by a faculty committee to the fellow who has made the most significant contributions in preparing and delivering their research.

Visit our most recent Resident/Fellow Research Day program for examples of typical areas of research interest. 
About University of Iowa Institute for Vision Research

The Retina Service is a regular site for major nationwide collaborative studies including:

  • Gene therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Trial (phase II/III sponsored by Spark Therapeutics)
  • Gene therapy for exudative AMD (phase I)
  • Combination anti-VEGF/PDGF therapy for wet AMD
  • Combination anti-VEGF/ang-2 therapies
  • Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trials
  • Visual cycle modulator for dry AMD
  • AREDS and AREDS II
  • Comparisons of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trial (CATT)
  • VIEW1 (VEGF-trap)
  • The Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS)
  • Choroidal Neovascularization Prevention Trial (CNVPT)
  • Submacular Surgery Trials (SST)
  • Complications of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Prevention Trial (CAPT)
  • Protein Kinase C Inhibitor Study of Diabetic Retinopathy
  • The Vitreoretinal Service has functioned as both an investigative center and as the national Photography Reading Center for the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS).

Research studies in large and small animals utilizing novel therapies focused on gene replacement and autologous, CRISPR-corrected stem cells are being conducted by Drs. Ian Han, Steve Russell, Elliott Sohn, Ed Stone, and Budd Tucker in the UI Institute for Vision Research.

Faculty and Research Areas of Interest

Michael D. Abramoff, portrait

Michael D. Abramoff, MD, PhD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Develop novel methods for computer aided diagnosis and image analysis - combining clinical ophthalmology, visual neuroscience, and bioinformatics to study the phenotypes and genotypes of these diseases.
  • Our team has developed image analysis algorithms that simulate visual processing by the human brain to improve existing image analysis techniques. We are starting to test the image processing algorithms on larger groups of patients collected through our retinal imaging networks.
  • We aim to make computer-aided diagnosis and digital retinal imaging for the screening, diagnosis and measurement of diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration and glaucoma, patient friendly, low-cost and effective.

Elaine M. Binkley, portrait

Elaine M. Binkley, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Clinical and translational research in ocular melanoma and other posterior segment tumors
  • Clinical and translational research in von Hippel Lindau disease

H. Culver Boldt

H. Culver Boldt, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Clinical research on ocular melanoma and other ocular neoplasms
  • Clinical research on proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration

Timothy M. Boyce, MD

Timothy M. Boyce, MD

Research Areas of Interest

 

  • Clinical and translational research on ocular inflammatory and inherited retinal diseases.

 

Karen Gehrs, MD


Ian Han, MD

Ian C. Han, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Clinical research involving multimodal retinal imaging for the discovery of imaging-related biomarkers, genotype-phenotype correlations, and novel insights into pathophysiology
  • Translational research involving rat models of retinal degeneration for the development of gene and stem cell therapy for inherited eye disease

Jonathan F. Russell, MD, PhD

Jonathan F. Russell, MD, PhD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Wide field OCT angiography, particularly for diabetic retinopathy
  • Multimodal retinal imaging to enhance diagnosis and pathophysiologic understanding of choroidal and retinal disease
  • Clinical and translational research in complex retinal detachment, severe ocular trauma, pediatric retinal disease, uveitis, and ophthalmic genetics

Stephen R. Russell, portrait

Stephen R. Russell, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Research focus is on evaluating treatments for retinal disorders, typically through clinical trials.
  • Currently investigating gene replacement therapy to treat Leber's congenital amaurosis, as well as evaluating a light cycle inhibitor to treat the atrophic form of age-related macular degeneration termed geographic atrophy.
  • Currently working on electronic enhancement and sensory substitution approaches for low vision navigation and function.

Elliott H. Sohn, portrait

Elliott H. Sohn, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Translational and clinical research related to retinal diseases, especially:
    • Age-related macular degeneration: from stem cell therapies to clinical trials to basic mechanisms of the pathophysiology especially related to genotype
    • Diabetic retinopathy: tissue and image-based analysis in mice and humans with focus on pathophysiology and treatment
    • Inherited macular dystrophies and retinal degenerations: gene and stem cell therapies in pigs and humans (multiple clinical trials underway with more upcoming) as well as phenotype-genotype correlations

Edwin Stone

Edwin M. Stone, MD, PhD

Research Area of Interest

  • Diagnosis, mechanistic understanding, and treatment of a wide variety of inherited retinal diseases

Research Labs

Research Laboratories for Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

The Carver College of Medicine is internationally recognized for its excellence and leadership in biomedical research. Among public medical schools, the College of Medicine ranks 11th in NIH funding in both the number of grants and total grant dollars per research faculty in public medical schools. University of Iowa Institute for Vision Research continues to garner funding for its ground-breaking research.

The University of Iowa is at the forefront among research universities in this country, and its contribution has been nationally recognized by such eminent authorities as the Carnegie Foundation, which classified The University of Iowa as having "very high research activity" among research universities.

Molecular Ophthalmology Laboratory

The Molecular Ophthalmology Laboratory (MOL) is a human genetics facility directed by Dr. Edwin Stone. The MOL is at the forefront of discovering and characterizing mutations involved in common and rare human inherited retinal and choroidal diseases. The laboratory is a repository for tens of thousands of human DNA samples and over a million corresponding clinical images.

The Chorioretinal Degenerations Laboratory is directed by Rob Mullins, PhD. The major focus of this laboratory is to understand the cellular and molecular basis of macular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and inherited maculopathies, in order to devise and deliver novel treatments.

The Steven W. Dezii Translational Vision Research Facility (DTVR) is a state of the art clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) facility fully dedicated to the academic non-profit production of gene and autologous stem cell based treatments for rare inherited blindness. The Dezii facility is directed by Dr Budd Tucker and is housed within the Institute for Vision Research.

Research in Gene Therapy for eye diseases is under the auspices of Ian C. Han, MDStephen R. Russell, MD,  Elliott H. Sohn, MDEdwin Stone, MD, PhD, and  Budd Tucker, PhD.  Drs. Russell and Sohn have collaborated with the pioneering gene therapists Al Maguire and Jean Bennett at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to treat children who are blind from birth with Leber congenital amaurosis. In addition Drs. Han, Russell, Sohn, Stone and Tucker are investigating gene replacement therapies and gene directed therapies in rodents and pigs for other inherited retinal conditions, using cells generated in the Ruby Laboratory and viral vectors synthesized in the Dezii facility.

The Howard F. Ruby Retinal Engineering Facility is an endowed laboratory focused on combining state-of-the-art patient-specific stem cell derived retinal cells with biodegradable tissue engineering technologies for the treatment of blinding retinal degenerative diseases. The Ruby Facility is directed by Budd Tucker, PhD

The John and Marcia Carver Nonprofit Genetic Testing Laboratory  directed by Dr. Edwin Stone is dedicated to providing non-profit genetic testing for all rare retinal diseases.

See additional information at UI Institute for Vision Research. The institute supports and coordinates the vision research activities of nine existing research units at the University of Iowa.

 

Retina Didactics

Retina Didactics lecture

Retina fellows experience an unparalleled amount and quality of didactics at the University of Iowa. The retina service holds daily, dedicated retina rounds. As all faculty have their own particular clinical and research areas of expertise, fellows get a wide breadth of case-based teaching in inherited retinal diseases, tumors, uveitis, infectious diseases affecting the posterior segment, common diseases such as AMD/diabetic retinopathy, and rare diseases referred from providers. In addition, there is a weekly retinal imaging conference that fellows (and/or residents on the retina rotation) present at on Monday evenings with faculty that are typically on rare, complex, or atypical presentation of common medical cases. Lastly, we have a detailed, comprehensive retina curriculum that integrates fellows into teaching residents in a structured, thoughtful manner.

In addition, the entire department has morning rounds at 8 a.m. that can range from case-based presentations by trainees, on-call rounds, sessions on tips for billing, ethics, advocacy, or research by faculty or visiting scientists. These are typically engaging sessions for all and represent a unique opportunity for all health care providers and staff in the department to be together. Friday mornings typically consist of BCSC lectures from 7—8:45 a.m.

Rounds, Lectures, and Conferences

Grand rounds are held Monday through Thursday from 8 to 8:45 a.m. in the Braley Auditorium. All residents and staff attend unless operating or engaged in acute medical care. During rounds, residents, and fellows develop their public speaking skills by making presentations. Discussion by the faculty and house staff follows each case.  The cases and discussions presented by Residents and Fellows at Grand Rounds are often further developed and published as case reports and tutorials on EyeRounds.org.

Inherited eye disease rounds (Stone Rounds) are held every Tuesday night from 5:30-7:00 PM in the Blodi Auditorium.  The are also available live via Zoom for interested physicians around the world.  Recent cases seen in the inherited retina clinics are discussed in detail by the clinicians who saw the patients and the scientists who are studying their diseases in the research laboratories.

Once per week during the academic year, didactic lectures on ophthalmology are presented. These two-hour lectures are organized to coincide with the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Basic and Clinical Sciences Course. Lectures cover most aspects of basic and clinical ophthalmology. Once every 10 weeks these sessions include a journal club covering recent journal articles in that subject area to help develop skills in practice based learning.

Six, day-long clinical conferences are held during the academic year. Clinics are closed on these days. Ophthalmologists from throughout Iowa and Illinois attend and present challenging clinical problems for discussion by faculty and guests. These meetings feature a visiting professor who presents a lecture based on his/ her research interests. The day is balanced by the presentation of a more clinically oriented topic. This conference has contributed to the excellent rapport between practicing ophthalmologists and the ophthalmology staff at the university. 

Each year in June, alumni and other members attend a two- to three-day Iowa Eye Association meeting with invited speakers and a focus on a specific subspecialty topic.

Presentations of research are made annually during the Resident/Fellow Research Conference at the end of the academic year.

Ophthalmology Upcoming Event Calendar

Schedule and Call

The curriculum, rotation and rotation sites consist of:

  • 2 days a week in the inherited retinal disease clinics at UIHC of Ian Han, MD, Stephen Russell, MD, Elliott Sohn, MD, and Edwin Stone, MD, PhD
  • 2 days a week in research that may involve any or all of the following according to the fellow’s specific interests and career goals:
    • Laboratory work in the Institute for Vision Research consisting of molecular genetics experimental research and writing the associated papers and grants
    • clinical trials for gene and stem-cell based therapies
    • pre-clinical rat and pig surgeries associated with gene therapy and stem cell transplantation
    • Retinal imaging
    • Phase I-III clinical trials of human retinal gene therapy
  • 1 day per week in a relatively independently managed fellow clinic seeing patients needing just-in-time procedures including intravitreal injections
  • Further clinical opportunities that may be available (with discretion of the fellowship director) include:
    • Maximum of 12 days for independent clinics that will be in place of fellow or faculty retina physicians.
    • Maximum of 12 days of retinal surgery that will be supervised by a faculty physician. If this option is exercised, we will mitigate impact on the 2 year vitreoretinal surgery fellowship by having the research fellow take a proportional number of days of vitreoretinal surgery fellow call.  Otherwise, there is no call associated with the Chung fellowship

       

Quick Facts

Benefits

The Mina Chung, MD Inherited Retinal Diseases Fellowship carries a stipend of $80K per year plus fringe benefits but could be altered in cases where alternative funding source (e.g. local government) is already in place.

Visit our GME site to find out about:

Board Certification Requirements

  • While Ophthalmology, as a specialty, is board certified, Ophthalmology subspecialty fellowships are not board certified. Visit the American Board of Ophthalmology for specifics on board certification requirements.

Patient volume in Retina 

  • Our patients represent all age groups and all socioeconomic strata and they present with virtually all acute and chronic conditions of the eye.
  • The UIHC is a tertiary care center and our department receives referrals for specialized services from Iowa and neighboring states. Some patients travel from outside the continent to be seen by our physicians.
  • In an average year there are approximately 20,000 retina/vitreous patient visits​

What's so good about Iowa?

  • Our faculty are really nice, and exceptionally dedicated teachers too.
  • We have a diverse faculty with wide-ranging clinical and research interests.
  • Most of our faculty are internationally known and some have been with us for many years.
  • We also have several bright young faculty who bring new interests and enthusiasm to the practice.
  • All the subspecialties are represented in our training program.
  • Our programs, clinical and teaching are consistently ranked in the top ten nationally.
  • Our fellows are great people and they make exceptional ophthalmologists.
  • Iowa City is a highly intellectual community with premier arts events that are accessible to residents both in terms of cost and location.
  • We have an outstanding school system for children in grades K-12.
  • A great training program and a high quality of life.
  • We want you to succeed.

Malpractice Insurance and GME Policies

Read about malpractice insurance and GME policies:

Malpractice Insurance

University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics is an agency of the State of Iowa, which self-insures the tort liability of the State and its employees under the provisions of the State Tort Claims Act, Chapter 669, Code of Iowa. Resident and Fellow Physicians at UI Hospitals & Clinics are State employees for the purposes of the State Tort Claims Act. The coverage provided to Resident and Fellow Physicians by the State Tort Claims Act is occurrence coverage.

GME Policies

We have indexed our policies and procedures in a document clearinghouse as a means of keeping items there as up to date as possible. Each of the documents listed on the clearinghouse page is in .pdf format and will be downloaded to your computer. All policies are subject to change.

About Mina Chung

About Mina Chung

Mina Chung, MD

Mina Millicent Chung, MD was an associate professor of ophthalmology at the University of Rochester Flaum Eye Institute. She completed a fellowship in vitreoretinal surgery at the University of Iowa, following residency and postdoctoral research at USC University Hospital in Los Angeles, where she served as chief resident from 2000 to 2002. Chung was a 1994 graduate of the Yale University School of Medicine who received her undergraduate degree from Yale in 1990. Her K-08 award at the University of Rochester was mentored by Edwin Stone, MD, PhD at the University of Iowa.

As a clinician, Dr. Chung provided medical and surgical care to patients suffering from retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic eye disease, genetic retinal diseases, ocular trauma, uveitis and other diseases relating to the posterior segment. She also specialized in pediatric retinal surgeries, inherited retinal diseases and ophthalmic imaging.

Our People

Elaine M. Binkley, portrait

Elaine M. Binkley, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Clinical and translational research in ocular melanoma and other posterior segment tumors
  • Clinical and translational research in von Hippel Lindau disease

Timothy M. Boyce, MD

Timothy M. Boyce, MD

Research Areas of Interest:

  • Clinical and translational research on ocular inflammatory and inherited retinal diseases

Terry Braun, portrait

Terry Braun

Research Areas of Interest

  • Developing software and bioinformatics to combine genomics and phenotypic data to study inherited eye disease.

H. Culver Boldt

H. Culver Boldt, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Clinical research on ocular melanoma and other ocular neoplasms
  • Clinical research on proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration

Ian Han, MD

Ian C. Han, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Clinical research involving multimodal retinal imaging for the discovery of imaging-related biomarkers, genotype-phenotype correlations, and novel insights into pathophysiology
  • Translational research involving rat models of retinal degeneration for the development of gene and stem cell therapy for inherited eye disease

Robert Mullins

Rob Mullins, PhD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Utilizing human donor eyes to elucidate the cellular pathophysiology of diseases affecting the human retina and choroid in order to identify targets for treatment

Jonathan F. Russell, MD, PhD

Jonathan F. Russell, MD, PhD

Research Areas of Interest:

  • Wide field OCT angiography, particularly for diabetic retinopathy
  • Multimodal retinal imaging to enhance diagnosis and pathophysiologic understanding of choroidal and retinal disease
  • Clinical and translational research in complex retinal detachment, severe ocular trauma, pediatric retinal disease, uveitis, and ophthalmic genetics

Stephen R. Russell, portrait

Stephen R. Russell, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Research focus is on evaluating treatments for retinal disorders, typically through clinical trials.
  • Currently investigating gene replacement therapy to treat Leber's congenital amaurosis, as well as evaluating a light cycle inhibitor to treat the atrophic form of age-related macular degeneration termed geographic atrophy.
  • Currently working on electronic enhancement and sensory substitution approaches for low vision navigation and function.

Todd Scheetz, portrait

Todd Scheetz

Research Areas of Interest

  • Bioinformatic investigations into the genetics and biology underlying inherited eye disease.

Val C. Sheffield, MD, PhD

Val Sheffield, MD, PhD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Molecular genetics of monogenic disorders, as well as polygenic and multifactorial disorders

Elliott H. Sohn, portrait

Elliott H. Sohn, MD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Translational and clinical research related to retinal diseases, especially:
    • Age-related macular degeneration: from stem cell therapies to clinical trials to basic mechanisms of the pathophysiology especially related to genotype
    • Diabetic retinopathy: tissue and image-based analysis in mice and humans with focus on pathophysiology and treatment
    • Inherited macular dystrophies and retinal degenerations–gene and stem cell therapies in pigs and humans as well as phenotype-genotype correlations
    • Development of vitreoretinal surgical inventions and procedures

Edwin M. Stone, portrait

Edwin M. Stone, MD, PhD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Genetic basis and disease mechanisms of inherited retinal diseases
  • Affordable genetic testing with high sensitivity and specificity
  • Affordable gene and stem-cell therapies for ALL inherited retinal diseases
  • Web-based teaching of inherited retinal diseases
  • Deming-based continuous process improvement in academic medicine

Budd Tucker, portrait

Budd Tucker, PhD

Research Areas of Interest

  • Disease modeling of inherited eye diseases using patient derived stem cells
  • Treatment using genome editing, gene augmentation, retinal engineering, and cell transplantation.

How to Apply

Start date for this fellowship is negotiable but preferably occurs July 1.

Inquiries for this fellowship should be submitted directly to:

Kim Tolsdorf, Fellowship Coordinator
kim-tolsdorf@uiowa.edu

or

H. Culver Boldt, MD, Fellowship Director
culver-boldt@uiowa.edu

If not trained in the US, all applicants must possess an H1B or O1 visa and be able to obtain permanent licensure through the Iowa Board of Medicine.